Utilizing collaborative technologies to create sustainable competitive advantage: Improving situation awareness to impact the decision-action cycle in the United States Navy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279801
Title:
Utilizing collaborative technologies to create sustainable competitive advantage: Improving situation awareness to impact the decision-action cycle in the United States Navy
Author:
Kruse, William John
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation depicts a two-year effort to improve group situation awareness (SA) in the U.S. Navy's Third Fleet. The research contributions of this work are in three primary areas: (1) the study of behavioral, social and political factors that affect technology transition in the military, (2) the determination of the requirements for SA collaboration in the Navy, and (3) the development of a collaborative system to support distributed group SA. This research utilized the Technology Transition Model (TTM) to guide the development and fielding of a web-based, thin client prototype logging application known as CommandNet. Through the course of this initiative, the political, social and behavioral aspects of the technology transition were found to be more important to the success of the project than the actual specific attributes of the software application. By propagating SA in near real time throughout the organization, the prototype application directly supported rapid coordinated decision-making and action in the fleet. Individual prototype users were found to have great power over the introduction and proliferation of the technology. Users at all levels of the military hierarchy became change agents that could not only encourage participation in the collaborative logs, but also establish usage norms that other users actively enforced. The users' willingness to adopt the prototype was largely a factor of fit with work processes, however, social factors such as status and recognition were often more important to the individual users than the practical aspects of the prototype. The elicitation of requirements and iterative development of the prototype GSS revealed four necessary attributes in support of group SA collaboration: (1) reliability, (2) responsiveness, (3) simplicity, and (4) flexibility. The more specific requirements of a logging tool derived from this work were the need for searches, entry analyses, and user alert notifications. Additionally, providing support for time zone changes, entry categorization, prioritization, system security, user access control, and a range of user controlled display options were discovered to be important prototype enhancements.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Management.; Computer Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Industrial Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nunamaker, Jay F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleUtilizing collaborative technologies to create sustainable competitive advantage: Improving situation awareness to impact the decision-action cycle in the United States Navyen_US
dc.creatorKruse, William Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorKruse, William Johnen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation depicts a two-year effort to improve group situation awareness (SA) in the U.S. Navy's Third Fleet. The research contributions of this work are in three primary areas: (1) the study of behavioral, social and political factors that affect technology transition in the military, (2) the determination of the requirements for SA collaboration in the Navy, and (3) the development of a collaborative system to support distributed group SA. This research utilized the Technology Transition Model (TTM) to guide the development and fielding of a web-based, thin client prototype logging application known as CommandNet. Through the course of this initiative, the political, social and behavioral aspects of the technology transition were found to be more important to the success of the project than the actual specific attributes of the software application. By propagating SA in near real time throughout the organization, the prototype application directly supported rapid coordinated decision-making and action in the fleet. Individual prototype users were found to have great power over the introduction and proliferation of the technology. Users at all levels of the military hierarchy became change agents that could not only encourage participation in the collaborative logs, but also establish usage norms that other users actively enforced. The users' willingness to adopt the prototype was largely a factor of fit with work processes, however, social factors such as status and recognition were often more important to the individual users than the practical aspects of the prototype. The elicitation of requirements and iterative development of the prototype GSS revealed four necessary attributes in support of group SA collaboration: (1) reliability, (2) responsiveness, (3) simplicity, and (4) flexibility. The more specific requirements of a logging tool derived from this work were the need for searches, entry analyses, and user alert notifications. Additionally, providing support for time zone changes, entry categorization, prioritization, system security, user access control, and a range of user controlled display options were discovered to be important prototype enhancements.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
dc.subjectComputer Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial Managementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNunamaker, Jay F.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3023483en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41957398en_US
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