Weight reduction in middle-aged women: Readiness profiles and correlates of success in a lifestyle intervention

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279799
Title:
Weight reduction in middle-aged women: Readiness profiles and correlates of success in a lifestyle intervention
Author:
Teixeira, Pedro Jorge
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The studies in this dissertation were primarily designed to (a) identify pretreatment dieting/weight history and psychosocial correlates of body habitus in overweight middle-age women; (b) identify prospective readiness profiles for 4-month weight loss; and (c) examine changes in psychosocial factors are their relationship with body habitus changes. Prior to, and after a 16-week behavioral intervention, subjects completed a comprehensive psychometric battery covering 30 distinct topics relevant to weight management. The cognitive-behavioral intervention involved 16 weekly meetings covering physical activity, healthy eating, cognitive-behavior strategies, and social support, targeting a rate of weight loss of about 0.5 kg/wk. Subjects were 112 overweight and obese women (age, 47.8 ± 4.4 yrs; BMI, 31.4 ± 3.9 kg/m2; body fat, 44.7 ± 5.6%). At baseline, body weight and fat were associated with worse quality of life and physical functioning and with a poorer body image. Mean weight and %fat losses among the 89 completers were -5.4 kg and -3.4%, respectively (P<0.001). More recent dieting attempts, recent weight losses (≥10 lb), more stringent weight outcome evaluations, higher impact of weight on quality of life, lower perceived vigor and self-motivation, higher body size dissatisfaction, and lower self-esteem predicted less weight loss and significantly distinguished responders from non-responders (P<0.05). A significant discriminant function analysis showed that about 62% of subjects could be correctly classified into their corresponding tertile of weight-loss success (most and least successful tertiles only). After the intervention, completers reported significant improvements in mood, body image, and self-concept, a decrease in impact of weight on quality of life, enhanced exercise self-efficacy and motivation, and less exercise perceived barriers. Subjects reported significant increases in eating restraint, decreases in overeating/bingeing, and reduced feelings of hunger, after the program. Four-month changes in physical functioning, eating-related variables (e.g. eating restraint), exercise intrinsic motivation, and self/body-concept were among the strongest process correlates of successful weight loss. In conclusion, psychosocial readiness profiles for weight loss were identified and can predict level of outcome with moderate success. A lifestyle weight reduction program can induce marked improvements in several dimensions of women's wellness and quality of life, many of which are associated with success in short-term weight management.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Behavioral.; Health Sciences, Nutrition.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutritional Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lohman, Timothy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleWeight reduction in middle-aged women: Readiness profiles and correlates of success in a lifestyle interventionen_US
dc.creatorTeixeira, Pedro Jorgeen_US
dc.contributor.authorTeixeira, Pedro Jorgeen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe studies in this dissertation were primarily designed to (a) identify pretreatment dieting/weight history and psychosocial correlates of body habitus in overweight middle-age women; (b) identify prospective readiness profiles for 4-month weight loss; and (c) examine changes in psychosocial factors are their relationship with body habitus changes. Prior to, and after a 16-week behavioral intervention, subjects completed a comprehensive psychometric battery covering 30 distinct topics relevant to weight management. The cognitive-behavioral intervention involved 16 weekly meetings covering physical activity, healthy eating, cognitive-behavior strategies, and social support, targeting a rate of weight loss of about 0.5 kg/wk. Subjects were 112 overweight and obese women (age, 47.8 ± 4.4 yrs; BMI, 31.4 ± 3.9 kg/m2; body fat, 44.7 ± 5.6%). At baseline, body weight and fat were associated with worse quality of life and physical functioning and with a poorer body image. Mean weight and %fat losses among the 89 completers were -5.4 kg and -3.4%, respectively (P<0.001). More recent dieting attempts, recent weight losses (≥10 lb), more stringent weight outcome evaluations, higher impact of weight on quality of life, lower perceived vigor and self-motivation, higher body size dissatisfaction, and lower self-esteem predicted less weight loss and significantly distinguished responders from non-responders (P<0.05). A significant discriminant function analysis showed that about 62% of subjects could be correctly classified into their corresponding tertile of weight-loss success (most and least successful tertiles only). After the intervention, completers reported significant improvements in mood, body image, and self-concept, a decrease in impact of weight on quality of life, enhanced exercise self-efficacy and motivation, and less exercise perceived barriers. Subjects reported significant increases in eating restraint, decreases in overeating/bingeing, and reduced feelings of hunger, after the program. Four-month changes in physical functioning, eating-related variables (e.g. eating restraint), exercise intrinsic motivation, and self/body-concept were among the strongest process correlates of successful weight loss. In conclusion, psychosocial readiness profiles for weight loss were identified and can predict level of outcome with moderate success. A lifestyle weight reduction program can induce marked improvements in several dimensions of women's wellness and quality of life, many of which are associated with success in short-term weight management.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLohman, Timothyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3023480en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41957362en_US
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