"A poor woman wants permit to go to Almshouse": Women, gender and poverty in New York's Burned-Over District, 1821-1861

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279797
Title:
"A poor woman wants permit to go to Almshouse": Women, gender and poverty in New York's Burned-Over District, 1821-1861
Author:
Cash, Sherri Goldstein
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation studies poor women and the poverty relief system in New York's "Burned-Over District," the region comprising the Erie Canal corridor, during the period 1821-1861. The study offers a response to the historiography of middle-class formation in the region, which has largely omitted discussion of the working class and particularly the poor. While charitable work was critical in middle-class women's activities, poor women themselves are shadowy figures in the historiography. The following dissertation attempts to elucidate who poor women in the region were and why and how they used the poverty relief system. The study also uses gender as a framework of analysis in examining the middle-class discourse about poverty, the poor and especially poor women. In this discourse, able-bodied married and widowed women appeared as relatively deserving of assistance or as "worthy" poor for much of the period while single mothers and childless single women appeared as "unworthy." By the end of the antebellum era, only downwardly mobile, formerly middle-class, white, Protestant women appeared in the discourse as poor women who were entitled to public dependence.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, United States.; Women's Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Anderson, Karen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.title"A poor woman wants permit to go to Almshouse": Women, gender and poverty in New York's Burned-Over District, 1821-1861en_US
dc.creatorCash, Sherri Goldsteinen_US
dc.contributor.authorCash, Sherri Goldsteinen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation studies poor women and the poverty relief system in New York's "Burned-Over District," the region comprising the Erie Canal corridor, during the period 1821-1861. The study offers a response to the historiography of middle-class formation in the region, which has largely omitted discussion of the working class and particularly the poor. While charitable work was critical in middle-class women's activities, poor women themselves are shadowy figures in the historiography. The following dissertation attempts to elucidate who poor women in the region were and why and how they used the poverty relief system. The study also uses gender as a framework of analysis in examining the middle-class discourse about poverty, the poor and especially poor women. In this discourse, able-bodied married and widowed women appeared as relatively deserving of assistance or as "worthy" poor for much of the period while single mothers and childless single women appeared as "unworthy." By the end of the antebellum era, only downwardly mobile, formerly middle-class, white, Protestant women appeared in the discourse as poor women who were entitled to public dependence.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAnderson, Karenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3016512en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41941561en_US
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