Effects of multiple bacterial species and nutrient injection on phenanthrene transport and bacterial cell elution

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279784
Title:
Effects of multiple bacterial species and nutrient injection on phenanthrene transport and bacterial cell elution
Author:
Patterson, Brandolyn Maltese
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of multiple bacterial species and nutrient injection on phenanthrene degradation, cell elution, and cell distribution within a column system. Three indigenous, phenanthrene degrading species, Actinobacter junii, Pseudamonas oleovorans, and Methylbacterium sp., were used. Characterization studies were conducted to determine the relative cell yield and cell hydrophobicity. Transport studies were conducted in a saturated column system. Results show single bacterial species produce relatively stable cell elution and phenanthrene biodegradation curves. In addition, it appears that cell density within the column may be dependent on cell hydrophobicity and possibly column carrying capacity. Conversely, phenanthrene degradation and cell elution was variable in the presence of multiple bacterial species. Results indicate that synergistic and antagonistic interactions occurred among the species. Injection of an alternative carbon source (R2B) enhanced phenanthrene degradation only in the single species column containing Actinobacter junii. It caused increased cell elution in Actinobacter junii and Pseudamonas oleovorans single species columns. No increase in degradation was found in multi-species columns injected with R2B. These studies illustrate that the dynamics of complex microbial communities should be considered when evaluating contaminant biodegradation and transport in subsurface systems. The findings presented here have important implications for representation of biodegradation in computer modeling and in the design of bioremediation strategies.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Environmental Sciences.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Soil, Water and Environmental Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brusseau, Mark L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffects of multiple bacterial species and nutrient injection on phenanthrene transport and bacterial cell elutionen_US
dc.creatorPatterson, Brandolyn Malteseen_US
dc.contributor.authorPatterson, Brandolyn Malteseen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of multiple bacterial species and nutrient injection on phenanthrene degradation, cell elution, and cell distribution within a column system. Three indigenous, phenanthrene degrading species, Actinobacter junii, Pseudamonas oleovorans, and Methylbacterium sp., were used. Characterization studies were conducted to determine the relative cell yield and cell hydrophobicity. Transport studies were conducted in a saturated column system. Results show single bacterial species produce relatively stable cell elution and phenanthrene biodegradation curves. In addition, it appears that cell density within the column may be dependent on cell hydrophobicity and possibly column carrying capacity. Conversely, phenanthrene degradation and cell elution was variable in the presence of multiple bacterial species. Results indicate that synergistic and antagonistic interactions occurred among the species. Injection of an alternative carbon source (R2B) enhanced phenanthrene degradation only in the single species column containing Actinobacter junii. It caused increased cell elution in Actinobacter junii and Pseudamonas oleovorans single species columns. No increase in degradation was found in multi-species columns injected with R2B. These studies illustrate that the dynamics of complex microbial communities should be considered when evaluating contaminant biodegradation and transport in subsurface systems. The findings presented here have important implications for representation of biodegradation in computer modeling and in the design of bioremediation strategies.en_US
dc.description.noteDigitization note: p. 124-125, 129, 132, and 139 missing from paper original. p. 86 missing from paper original; appears to be pagination error rather than missing content.-
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water and Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrusseau, Mark L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3016489en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41936814en_US
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