Tumpituxwinap (Storied Rocks): Southern Paiute Rock Art in the Colorado River Corridor

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279732
Title:
Tumpituxwinap (Storied Rocks): Southern Paiute Rock Art in the Colorado River Corridor
Author:
Stoffle, Richard W.; Loendorf, Lawrence L.; Austin, Diane E.; Halmo, David B.; Bulletts, Angelita S.; Fulfrost, Brian K.
Affiliation:
Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
Sep-1995
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizona
Description:
The Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) is interested in understanding the human and environmental consequences of past Glen Canyon Dam water release policies and using these data to inform future water release and land management policies. One step in this direction is to understand how American Indian people have used the Colorado River and adjoining lands in Glen Canyon and Grand Canyon. The BOR, through its Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES) office, has provided funds for various American Indian groups to identify places and things of cultural significance in the 300 mile long river and canyon ecosystem that has come to be called the Colorado River Corridor. This study is the second to report on the cultural resources of the Southern Paiute people found in this riverine ecosystem. The rock art study funded by the BOR and managed by the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES) office is the basis of this report. This study is unique in the history of rock art studies and is unusual when compared with other American Indian cultural resource assessments. There are five unique features of this study. First, all funds for conducting the research were contracted to the Southern Paiute Consortium. Second, the Southern Paiute people decided during the previous studies that their next study would be about rock art. Third, the GCES /BOR permitted research to be conducted in terms of Paiute perceptions of the study area rather than specifically in terms of the scientifically established study area for the project. Thus, it was possible to conduct the Kanab Creek side canyon study. Fourth, all interviews were guided by a ten -page survey instrument, so Southern Paiute responses could be systematically compared. Fifth, both all-male and all- female research trips were conducted, thus producing the first gender - specific interviews of rock art sites. The resulting study is both interdisciplinary and multivocal.
Note:
This is the public version of this report. A restricted access version was prepared for tribal members only. This report is one of three reports produced for the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies Program.
Keywords:
Grand Canyon; Southern Paiute; Rock Art Studies; Colorado River; Kanab Creek; Cultural Landscapes

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTumpituxwinap (Storied Rocks): Southern Paiute Rock Art in the Colorado River Corridoren_US
dc.contributor.authorStoffle, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLoendorf, Lawrence L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAustin, Diane E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHalmo, David B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBulletts, Angelita S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFulfrost, Brian K.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentBureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1995-09-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.sourceUniversity of Arizona Libraries, Special Collectionsen_US
dc.publisherBureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.descriptionThe Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) is interested in understanding the human and environmental consequences of past Glen Canyon Dam water release policies and using these data to inform future water release and land management policies. One step in this direction is to understand how American Indian people have used the Colorado River and adjoining lands in Glen Canyon and Grand Canyon. The BOR, through its Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES) office, has provided funds for various American Indian groups to identify places and things of cultural significance in the 300 mile long river and canyon ecosystem that has come to be called the Colorado River Corridor. This study is the second to report on the cultural resources of the Southern Paiute people found in this riverine ecosystem. The rock art study funded by the BOR and managed by the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES) office is the basis of this report. This study is unique in the history of rock art studies and is unusual when compared with other American Indian cultural resource assessments. There are five unique features of this study. First, all funds for conducting the research were contracted to the Southern Paiute Consortium. Second, the Southern Paiute people decided during the previous studies that their next study would be about rock art. Third, the GCES /BOR permitted research to be conducted in terms of Paiute perceptions of the study area rather than specifically in terms of the scientifically established study area for the project. Thus, it was possible to conduct the Kanab Creek side canyon study. Fourth, all interviews were guided by a ten -page survey instrument, so Southern Paiute responses could be systematically compared. Fifth, both all-male and all- female research trips were conducted, thus producing the first gender - specific interviews of rock art sites. The resulting study is both interdisciplinary and multivocal.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is the public version of this report. A restricted access version was prepared for tribal members only. This report is one of three reports produced for the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies Program.en_US
dc.subjectGrand Canyonen_US
dc.subjectSouthern Paiuteen_US
dc.subjectRock Art Studiesen_US
dc.subjectColorado Riveren_US
dc.subjectKanab Creeken_US
dc.subjectCultural Landscapesen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/279732-
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.