Pah hu wichi (From Big Spring Running Down): Big Spring Ethnographic Assessment US 95 Corridor Study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278952
Title:
Pah hu wichi (From Big Spring Running Down): Big Spring Ethnographic Assessment US 95 Corridor Study
Author:
Stoffle, Richard W.; Pittaluga, Fabio; Earnest, Tray G.; Eisenberg, Amy; Amato, John; Dewey-Hefley Genevieve
Affiliation:
Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
Sep-1998
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizona
Description:
It was determined in the mid- 1990s that Highway 95 in southern Nevada had experienced a tremendous increase in traffic and increased safety hazards for motorists due to growth in population and commerce in the Southwest. Federal, state, and local governments worked to find a solution to the impacts of increased traffic and have chosen a number of alternatives related to highway expansion. This is an American Indian ethnographic study for the Big Springs Highway 95 Corridor Project. The study area included the Big Spring Complex and associated American Indian sites potentially impacted by the westward expansion of U.S. 95 north of its junction with U.S. 15. The study does not include an analysis of U.S. 95 impacts to the east of the Big Springs complex towards what is known as Lorenzi Park. This report is based on interviews with American Indian representatives from six Southern Paiute tribes and the Las Vegas Indian Center. Each tribe and organization chose to send one or more tribal members to evaluate the potential impacts to American Indian cultural resources that would occur if Highway 95 were to be expanded to incorporate a portion of the current Big Spring location. This report provides the Southern Paiute evaluations of the proposed expansion.
Keywords:
Southern Paiute; Environmental Impact Assessment; Las Vegas; Highway 95 Expansion

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePah hu wichi (From Big Spring Running Down): Big Spring Ethnographic Assessment US 95 Corridor Studyen_US
dc.contributor.authorStoffle, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPittaluga, Fabioen_US
dc.contributor.authorEarnest, Tray G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEisenberg, Amyen_US
dc.contributor.authorAmato, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorDewey-Hefley Genevieveen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1998-09-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.sourceUniversity of Arizona Libraries, Special Collectionsen_US
dc.publisherBureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.descriptionIt was determined in the mid- 1990s that Highway 95 in southern Nevada had experienced a tremendous increase in traffic and increased safety hazards for motorists due to growth in population and commerce in the Southwest. Federal, state, and local governments worked to find a solution to the impacts of increased traffic and have chosen a number of alternatives related to highway expansion. This is an American Indian ethnographic study for the Big Springs Highway 95 Corridor Project. The study area included the Big Spring Complex and associated American Indian sites potentially impacted by the westward expansion of U.S. 95 north of its junction with U.S. 15. The study does not include an analysis of U.S. 95 impacts to the east of the Big Springs complex towards what is known as Lorenzi Park. This report is based on interviews with American Indian representatives from six Southern Paiute tribes and the Las Vegas Indian Center. Each tribe and organization chose to send one or more tribal members to evaluate the potential impacts to American Indian cultural resources that would occur if Highway 95 were to be expanded to incorporate a portion of the current Big Spring location. This report provides the Southern Paiute evaluations of the proposed expansion.en_US
dc.subjectSouthern Paiuteen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Impact Assessmenten_US
dc.subjectLas Vegasen_US
dc.subjectHighway 95 Expansionen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278952-
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