School peer sexual harassment and teen dating violence: What's the difference?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278813
Title:
School peer sexual harassment and teen dating violence: What's the difference?
Author:
Goebel, Stefanie Elizabeth
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The relationship between perpetrator and target, as a factor in school peer sexual harassment, has been particularly neglected (Stein, 1999). This relationship spans nonromantic and romantic interest between peers. This paper focuses on peer relationship, as a dimension of overlap and intersection between peer school sexual harassment and dating violence. My project is a qualitative interview-study of the sexual harassment experiences of eighteen 13 to 20-year-olds, particularly where there is romantic interest involved between harasser and target. The study's findings show school sexual harassment and teen dating violence to overlap and intersect in the areas of behavior (physical or nonphysical), relationship (romantic or nonromantic), and location (more private to more public places at or away from school). Important contextual information about school sexual harassment revealed by the data includes: (1) school sexual harassment occurring in all peer relationships, including dating and ex-dating relationships, (2) patterns of school sexual harassment behavior that resemble obsessive control in stalking and dating violence, (3) the protracted or violent nature of the harassment (like dating violence), and (4) the high levels of upset and injury experienced by the target (similar to dating violence). My results suggest that peer relationship context is critical to understanding significant aspects of peer sexual harassment, including the power and gender dynamics which underlie the behaviors, and to revealing its similarities and overlap with dating violence.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women's Studies.; Health Sciences, Public Health.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.; Sociology, Public and Social Welfare.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Women's Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
MacCorquodale, Patricia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSchool peer sexual harassment and teen dating violence: What's the difference?en_US
dc.creatorGoebel, Stefanie Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoebel, Stefanie Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between perpetrator and target, as a factor in school peer sexual harassment, has been particularly neglected (Stein, 1999). This relationship spans nonromantic and romantic interest between peers. This paper focuses on peer relationship, as a dimension of overlap and intersection between peer school sexual harassment and dating violence. My project is a qualitative interview-study of the sexual harassment experiences of eighteen 13 to 20-year-olds, particularly where there is romantic interest involved between harasser and target. The study's findings show school sexual harassment and teen dating violence to overlap and intersect in the areas of behavior (physical or nonphysical), relationship (romantic or nonromantic), and location (more private to more public places at or away from school). Important contextual information about school sexual harassment revealed by the data includes: (1) school sexual harassment occurring in all peer relationships, including dating and ex-dating relationships, (2) patterns of school sexual harassment behavior that resemble obsessive control in stalking and dating violence, (3) the protracted or violent nature of the harassment (like dating violence), and (4) the high levels of upset and injury experienced by the target (similar to dating violence). My results suggest that peer relationship context is critical to understanding significant aspects of peer sexual harassment, including the power and gender dynamics which underlie the behaviors, and to revealing its similarities and overlap with dating violence.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Public and Social Welfare.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineWomen's Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMacCorquodale, Patriciaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1417099en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44825249en_US
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