The white knight: Edwin Austin Abbey's "Quest for the Holy Grail" in the Boston Public Library

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278796
Title:
The white knight: Edwin Austin Abbey's "Quest for the Holy Grail" in the Boston Public Library
Author:
Bell, Aileen E.
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Boston Public Library was founded on the principle that it would serve the needs of Boston's entire populace, without respect to class, race, or gender. However, despite this democratic ideology, the nineteenth-century library, in its practices and artistic expressions, articulated an elite conception of the perfect American. Edwin Austin Abbey's Quest for the Holy Grail (1890--1902), painted for the library building of McKim, Mead, and White (begun 1883), embodies the cosmopolitan, Protestant, Anglo-Saxon, and masculine values of Boston's elite through its American Renaissance style, its subject, and its iconography. In particular, the figure of Galahad, the hero of Abbey's mural, conforms to models of spirituality, race, and manhood that legitimated the power and social position of the financial, political, and cultural elite that administered and constructed the library.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Art History.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Art History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Moore, Sarah J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe white knight: Edwin Austin Abbey's "Quest for the Holy Grail" in the Boston Public Libraryen_US
dc.creatorBell, Aileen E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBell, Aileen E.en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Boston Public Library was founded on the principle that it would serve the needs of Boston's entire populace, without respect to class, race, or gender. However, despite this democratic ideology, the nineteenth-century library, in its practices and artistic expressions, articulated an elite conception of the perfect American. Edwin Austin Abbey's Quest for the Holy Grail (1890--1902), painted for the library building of McKim, Mead, and White (begun 1883), embodies the cosmopolitan, Protestant, Anglo-Saxon, and masculine values of Boston's elite through its American Renaissance style, its subject, and its iconography. In particular, the figure of Galahad, the hero of Abbey's mural, conforms to models of spirituality, race, and manhood that legitimated the power and social position of the financial, political, and cultural elite that administered and constructed the library.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectArt History.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArt Historyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMoore, Sarah J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1410268en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43042739en_US
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