Relationship between remnant size and plant species richness in the Tucson urban matrix

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278795
Title:
Relationship between remnant size and plant species richness in the Tucson urban matrix
Author:
Duncan, Allison B.
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Sonoran Desert surrounding Tucson, Arizona is the dominant matrix in a region undergoing a transition from desert matrix to urban matrix with little emphasis placed on preserving this native ecosystem intact. Instead, patches of desert, remnants, are cut off the desert matrix and surrounded by a variety of land uses including residential, transit, and commercial. 31 sites within the City of Tucson were surveyed and the site's plant species richness, woody cover, herbaceous cover, and disturbance percentage measured. The plants found on-site were classified into native or exotic, annual or perennial, and woody or herbaceous, and further broken down into growth form. Results indicated a significant correlation between a site's area and its percent disturbance, as well as correlations between its native vegetation and area.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Landscape Architecture.; Urban and Regional Planning.
Degree Name:
M.L.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Landscape Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Livingston, Margaret

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRelationship between remnant size and plant species richness in the Tucson urban matrixen_US
dc.creatorDuncan, Allison B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Allison B.en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Sonoran Desert surrounding Tucson, Arizona is the dominant matrix in a region undergoing a transition from desert matrix to urban matrix with little emphasis placed on preserving this native ecosystem intact. Instead, patches of desert, remnants, are cut off the desert matrix and surrounded by a variety of land uses including residential, transit, and commercial. 31 sites within the City of Tucson were surveyed and the site's plant species richness, woody cover, herbaceous cover, and disturbance percentage measured. The plants found on-site were classified into native or exotic, annual or perennial, and woody or herbaceous, and further broken down into growth form. Results indicated a significant correlation between a site's area and its percent disturbance, as well as correlations between its native vegetation and area.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectLandscape Architecture.en_US
dc.subjectUrban and Regional Planning.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.L.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLandscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLivingston, Margareten_US
dc.identifier.proquest1410267en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43042363en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.