Is the constitution of a greenway trail network associated with cycling commuter use?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278791
Title:
Is the constitution of a greenway trail network associated with cycling commuter use?
Author:
Sager, Brian A.
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study of the physical composition of greenway trail networks focuses on how a trail system interacts with a city, and how the city's population interacts with the trail system. Previous studies have suggested that a trail system's use and length have a symbiotic relationship, while other studies propose that a trail is used in accordance with its location within the city. Most current transportation and ecological studies focus on linkage, and present connectivity as the best condition of a linear system. Sixteen case studies are presented and critiqued according to criteria developed in the paper. Statistical analysis is employed to analyze the numeric data, and recommendations are distilled from the statistical analysis and literature review. It is proposed that the physical nature of a greenway system does not effect the city's commuter cycling levels, and a city's cycling culture is the most influential factor in commuter cycling levels.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Landscape Architecture.; Transportation.; Urban and Regional Planning.
Degree Name:
M.L.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stoltz, Ronald R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleIs the constitution of a greenway trail network associated with cycling commuter use?en_US
dc.creatorSager, Brian A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSager, Brian A.en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study of the physical composition of greenway trail networks focuses on how a trail system interacts with a city, and how the city's population interacts with the trail system. Previous studies have suggested that a trail system's use and length have a symbiotic relationship, while other studies propose that a trail is used in accordance with its location within the city. Most current transportation and ecological studies focus on linkage, and present connectivity as the best condition of a linear system. Sixteen case studies are presented and critiqued according to criteria developed in the paper. Statistical analysis is employed to analyze the numeric data, and recommendations are distilled from the statistical analysis and literature review. It is proposed that the physical nature of a greenway system does not effect the city's commuter cycling levels, and a city's cycling culture is the most influential factor in commuter cycling levels.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLandscape Architecture.en_US
dc.subjectTransportation.en_US
dc.subjectUrban and Regional Planning.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.L.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitecture, Planning, and Landscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStoltz, Ronald R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1410264en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43038293en_US
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