Habitat, spatial population structure, and methods for monitoring barking frogs (Eleutherodactylus augusti) in southern Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278788
Title:
Habitat, spatial population structure, and methods for monitoring barking frogs (Eleutherodactylus augusti) in southern Arizona
Author:
Goldberg, Caren
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Debate over global declines of amphibian populations has focused researchers' attention on the lack of basic life-history information about and appropriate monitoring methods for amphibian species. We studied barking frogs ( Eleutherodactylus augusti) in a canyon in the Huachuca Mountains of southern Arizona. Annual (capture) surveys and radio-tracking revealed that most barking frogs in this canyon are strongly associated with limestone. Adults rarely moved between limestone outcrops and numbers of frogs on each outcrop were small. Subpopulations consisting of frogs on sets of neighboring outcrops probably function as a metapopulation. We evaluated four methods for monitoring population size of this species: mark-recapture, distance sampling, visual encounter surveys, and call counts. We found none of these to be able to detect changes in population size powerfully enough to alert managers to declines as they occur. We suggest resource managers focus monitoring efforts on distribution rather than population size.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Biostatistics.; Biology, Ecology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Schwalbe, Cecil R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHabitat, spatial population structure, and methods for monitoring barking frogs (Eleutherodactylus augusti) in southern Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorGoldberg, Carenen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoldberg, Carenen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDebate over global declines of amphibian populations has focused researchers' attention on the lack of basic life-history information about and appropriate monitoring methods for amphibian species. We studied barking frogs ( Eleutherodactylus augusti) in a canyon in the Huachuca Mountains of southern Arizona. Annual (capture) surveys and radio-tracking revealed that most barking frogs in this canyon are strongly associated with limestone. Adults rarely moved between limestone outcrops and numbers of frogs on each outcrop were small. Subpopulations consisting of frogs on sets of neighboring outcrops probably function as a metapopulation. We evaluated four methods for monitoring population size of this species: mark-recapture, distance sampling, visual encounter surveys, and call counts. We found none of these to be able to detect changes in population size powerfully enough to alert managers to declines as they occur. We suggest resource managers focus monitoring efforts on distribution rather than population size.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Biostatistics.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSchwalbe, Cecil R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1409489en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42819544en_US
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