Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278786
Title:
Does neural synchrony reflect conscious visual perception?
Author:
Trujillo, Logan
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated the relationship between synchronous neural activity and conscious visual perception by directly measuring neural synchrony in human EEG data collected during a perceptual task that controlled for the influence of attention. Improving a recently developed experimental paradigm and synchrony detection method (Rodriguez et al., 1999), participants viewed upright and scrambled Mooney face stimuli (fragmented black and white shapes that are perceived as faces upon visual closure) over 1000 ms exposures while performing a secondary attention task. During both presentation conditions, gamma-band synchrony increased to a maximum and then decreased to an above-baseline stationary level. Synchrony for the upright condition was significantly greater than synchrony for the scrambled condition during early and late portions of the exposure period. This result supports the hypothesis that neural synchrony mediates conscious visual organization and feature binding, although the possibility for a role in perception-related attention processes cannot be excluded.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Neuroscience.; Psychology, Psychobiology.; Psychology, Experimental.; Psychology, Cognitive.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Peterson, Mary A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDoes neural synchrony reflect conscious visual perception?en_US
dc.creatorTrujillo, Loganen_US
dc.contributor.authorTrujillo, Loganen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the relationship between synchronous neural activity and conscious visual perception by directly measuring neural synchrony in human EEG data collected during a perceptual task that controlled for the influence of attention. Improving a recently developed experimental paradigm and synchrony detection method (Rodriguez et al., 1999), participants viewed upright and scrambled Mooney face stimuli (fragmented black and white shapes that are perceived as faces upon visual closure) over 1000 ms exposures while performing a secondary attention task. During both presentation conditions, gamma-band synchrony increased to a maximum and then decreased to an above-baseline stationary level. Synchrony for the upright condition was significantly greater than synchrony for the scrambled condition during early and late portions of the exposure period. This result supports the hypothesis that neural synchrony mediates conscious visual organization and feature binding, although the possibility for a role in perception-related attention processes cannot be excluded.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Neuroscience.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Psychobiology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Experimental.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPeterson, Mary A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1409485en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42811600en_US
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