Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278771
Title:
The effect of positive feedback on effort in Alzheimer's patients
Author:
Devlin, Kathleen Marie, 1969-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Although several studies have alluded to the importance of reinforcement as a component of interventions involving Alzheimer's Disease patients, no studies have looked specifically at the effect of reinforcement on effort within this population. Bandura's social learning model posits that any effect of reinforcement is mediated through a change in self-efficacy. Alternatively, the behavioral perspective states that reinforcement would increase effort, regardless of self-efficacy change. Support for behavior change without a corresponding change in self-efficacy is found in the implicit learning literature discussing its dissociation from explicit learning. This study found that reinforcement did not consistently affect self-efficacy, nor did self-efficacy affect effort. Implications for Bandura's social learning model are discussed. Reinforcement was found to affect effort only when given later in the testing period. This differential effect is discussed in terms of fatigue.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Mental Health.; Gerontology.; Psychology, Clinical.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kaszniak, Alfred W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effect of positive feedback on effort in Alzheimer's patientsen_US
dc.creatorDevlin, Kathleen Marie, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorDevlin, Kathleen Marie, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough several studies have alluded to the importance of reinforcement as a component of interventions involving Alzheimer's Disease patients, no studies have looked specifically at the effect of reinforcement on effort within this population. Bandura's social learning model posits that any effect of reinforcement is mediated through a change in self-efficacy. Alternatively, the behavioral perspective states that reinforcement would increase effort, regardless of self-efficacy change. Support for behavior change without a corresponding change in self-efficacy is found in the implicit learning literature discussing its dissociation from explicit learning. This study found that reinforcement did not consistently affect self-efficacy, nor did self-efficacy affect effort. Implications for Bandura's social learning model are discussed. Reinforcement was found to affect effort only when given later in the testing period. This differential effect is discussed in terms of fatigue.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Mental Health.en_US
dc.subjectGerontology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1342961en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26622075en_US
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