Universals in perceived politeness: Comparison of native and non-native speakers of English

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278766
Title:
Universals in perceived politeness: Comparison of native and non-native speakers of English
Author:
Koyama, Tetsuharu
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Notwithstanding its significance as a communicative apparatus for social interaction, the general mechanism of politeness has been less clear partly because a wide variety of realization patterns of politeness strategies exist across cultures and languages. Researchers who are sensitive to the cultural and linguistic diversities of communication styles have claimed that politeness varies in its conceptualization and practices across cultures and languages, whereas linguists in pragmatics have assumed that politeness is a part of a universally rational communication system that operates in the same way for any language user. This study attempts to investigate the universal mechanism of politeness presumably built into any language system. At the same time, potential cross-cultural differences in values assigned to politeness are explored to determine what interferes with people's universal competence in perceiving politeness. In comparing native and nonnative speakers of English, people's judgments of politeness and other notions closely related to politeness were assessed for several speech act types in English. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Speech Communication.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jacobs, C. Scott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleUniversals in perceived politeness: Comparison of native and non-native speakers of Englishen_US
dc.creatorKoyama, Tetsuharuen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoyama, Tetsuharuen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractNotwithstanding its significance as a communicative apparatus for social interaction, the general mechanism of politeness has been less clear partly because a wide variety of realization patterns of politeness strategies exist across cultures and languages. Researchers who are sensitive to the cultural and linguistic diversities of communication styles have claimed that politeness varies in its conceptualization and practices across cultures and languages, whereas linguists in pragmatics have assumed that politeness is a part of a universally rational communication system that operates in the same way for any language user. This study attempts to investigate the universal mechanism of politeness presumably built into any language system. At the same time, potential cross-cultural differences in values assigned to politeness are explored to determine what interferes with people's universal competence in perceiving politeness. In comparing native and nonnative speakers of English, people's judgments of politeness and other notions closely related to politeness were assessed for several speech act types in English. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJacobs, C. Scotten_US
dc.identifier.proquest1405047en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41905313en_US
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