Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278759
Title:
Restoring ponderosa pine forests in the Black Hills, South Dakota
Author:
Wienk, Cody Lee
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) forests have changed considerably during the past century, partly because recurrent fires have been absent for a century or more. In dense stands of ponderosa pine in the Black Hills of South Dakota, a layer of pine needles has replaced understory vegetation. I examined the disturbance history, soil seed bank, and effects of prescribed burning and overstory reduction on understory vegetation in a ponderosa pine stand in the northern Black Hills. Cessation of fires, prolific ponderosa pine regeneration, and logging led to a dense, even-aged stand with very little understory vegetation and few viable seeds in the soil seed bank. Understory vegetation did not respond to restoration treatments the first growing season, but did respond the second growing season. Paucity of viable seeds in the soil seed bank does not appear to constrain recruitment of understory vegetation in dense ponderosa pine forests of South Dakota.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McPherson, Guy R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRestoring ponderosa pine forests in the Black Hills, South Dakotaen_US
dc.creatorWienk, Cody Leeen_US
dc.contributor.authorWienk, Cody Leeen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPonderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) forests have changed considerably during the past century, partly because recurrent fires have been absent for a century or more. In dense stands of ponderosa pine in the Black Hills of South Dakota, a layer of pine needles has replaced understory vegetation. I examined the disturbance history, soil seed bank, and effects of prescribed burning and overstory reduction on understory vegetation in a ponderosa pine stand in the northern Black Hills. Cessation of fires, prolific ponderosa pine regeneration, and logging led to a dense, even-aged stand with very little understory vegetation and few viable seeds in the soil seed bank. Understory vegetation did not respond to restoration treatments the first growing season, but did respond the second growing season. Paucity of viable seeds in the soil seed bank does not appear to constrain recruitment of understory vegetation in dense ponderosa pine forests of South Dakota.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcPherson, Guy R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1405038en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41885478en_US
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