Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278725
Title:
Effects of transplanting saguaros on native cavity nesting birds
Author:
Morales, Susana Maria
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Expanding urbanization into undisturbed Sonoran Desert vegetation has led to public concern over the removal and destruction of large saguaro cacti (Carnegia gigantea). Development mitigation plans were established requiring transplantation, salvage and replacement of saguaros in certain development sites. However, no research has assessed whether native birds use transplanted saguaros at the same rate as non-transplanted cacti. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of saguaro transplantation on nest use. In Tucson, Arizona, 87 transplanted and 28 non-transplanted saguaros on a developed site and 26 non-transplanted saguaros on an undisturbed site were selected for observation of bird nesting activity during the breeding seasons of 1997 and 1998. Birds showed a preference for saguaros, transplanted or non-transplanted, which were surrounded by native vegetation and in areas with low human activity. I suggest that guidelines be revised for development mitigation standards and saguaro transplanting.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Wildlife and Fisheries Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Halvorson, William L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffects of transplanting saguaros on native cavity nesting birdsen_US
dc.creatorMorales, Susana Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorales, Susana Mariaen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractExpanding urbanization into undisturbed Sonoran Desert vegetation has led to public concern over the removal and destruction of large saguaro cacti (Carnegia gigantea). Development mitigation plans were established requiring transplantation, salvage and replacement of saguaros in certain development sites. However, no research has assessed whether native birds use transplanted saguaros at the same rate as non-transplanted cacti. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of saguaro transplantation on nest use. In Tucson, Arizona, 87 transplanted and 28 non-transplanted saguaros on a developed site and 26 non-transplanted saguaros on an undisturbed site were selected for observation of bird nesting activity during the breeding seasons of 1997 and 1998. Birds showed a preference for saguaros, transplanted or non-transplanted, which were surrounded by native vegetation and in areas with low human activity. I suggest that guidelines be revised for development mitigation standards and saguaro transplanting.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineWildlife and Fisheries Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHalvorson, William L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1399730en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4063954xen_US
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