Effects of fire on vegetation in the upper encinal woodlands: A case study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278710
Title:
Effects of fire on vegetation in the upper encinal woodlands: A case study
Author:
Jones, Robert Phelps
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effects of fire on vegetation in the upper encinal woodlands, Santa Catalina Mountains, southeastern Arizona, were studied following a wildfire in July 1995. Similar unburned and burned sites were compared to determine differences (alpha = .05) for frequency, density, and percent cover of herbs, shrubs, and trees through observations made during early June of 1997 and 1998 (two and three years postfire). For herbs, which showed their opportunistic characters, differences existed for frequency and percent cover each year and density in the third year. For shrubs, due to the ability of the dominant species, Arctostaphylos pungens (pointleaf manzanita), to rapidly reseed itself, no differences existed for frequency or density each year; but total mortality of mature A. pungens resulted in differences for percent cover each year. For trees, due to the ability of Quercus spp. to vigorously stump sprout, no differences existed for frequency, density, or percent cover each year.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.; Environmental Sciences.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable natural resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ffolliott, Peter F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffects of fire on vegetation in the upper encinal woodlands: A case studyen_US
dc.creatorJones, Robert Phelpsen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Robert Phelpsen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effects of fire on vegetation in the upper encinal woodlands, Santa Catalina Mountains, southeastern Arizona, were studied following a wildfire in July 1995. Similar unburned and burned sites were compared to determine differences (alpha = .05) for frequency, density, and percent cover of herbs, shrubs, and trees through observations made during early June of 1997 and 1998 (two and three years postfire). For herbs, which showed their opportunistic characters, differences existed for frequency and percent cover each year and density in the third year. For shrubs, due to the ability of the dominant species, Arctostaphylos pungens (pointleaf manzanita), to rapidly reseed itself, no differences existed for frequency or density each year; but total mortality of mature A. pungens resulted in differences for percent cover each year. For trees, due to the ability of Quercus spp. to vigorously stump sprout, no differences existed for frequency, density, or percent cover each year.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable natural resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFfolliott, Peter F.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1397829en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4014334xen_US
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