Contemporary directing approaches to the classical Athenian chorus: The blood of Atreus

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278695
Title:
Contemporary directing approaches to the classical Athenian chorus: The blood of Atreus
Author:
Grittner, Michael Curtis
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The theory suggests that the masked chorus in classical Greek tragedy sang and danced and represented the ritualistic and political nature of Athenian society. No manual defining the employment of these elements in performance survives. Therefore, directors must construct their own visions of the ancient Greek elements for contemporary performance. This study surveys theory concerning the functions of choral conventions in their original context. Then, treatments of costume, mask, movement, music, and text in contemporary productions of the Oresteia follow. The Oresteia is used for comparison because the chorus is an important character in the action and the mythological issues are relevant to the present. Productions by directors Peter Hall, Ariane Mnouchkine, Peter Stein, and Garland Wright are examined for their interpretations of ritualistic aura, textual concerns, and visual appearance. The variant approaches explore the possibilities of shaping innovative and relevant choruses for contemporary productions of Athenian tragedy.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Theater.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Theatre Arts
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dickey, Jerry R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleContemporary directing approaches to the classical Athenian chorus: The blood of Atreusen_US
dc.creatorGrittner, Michael Curtisen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrittner, Michael Curtisen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe theory suggests that the masked chorus in classical Greek tragedy sang and danced and represented the ritualistic and political nature of Athenian society. No manual defining the employment of these elements in performance survives. Therefore, directors must construct their own visions of the ancient Greek elements for contemporary performance. This study surveys theory concerning the functions of choral conventions in their original context. Then, treatments of costume, mask, movement, music, and text in contemporary productions of the Oresteia follow. The Oresteia is used for comparison because the chorus is an important character in the action and the mythological issues are relevant to the present. Productions by directors Peter Hall, Ariane Mnouchkine, Peter Stein, and Garland Wright are examined for their interpretations of ritualistic aura, textual concerns, and visual appearance. The variant approaches explore the possibilities of shaping innovative and relevant choruses for contemporary productions of Athenian tragedy.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTheater.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTheatre Artsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDickey, Jerry R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1395271en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39652336en_US
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