Globalization and the corporate sponsorship of Navajo education: New perspectives on assimilation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278694
Title:
Globalization and the corporate sponsorship of Navajo education: New perspectives on assimilation
Author:
Juliani, Richard Parker
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
When contemporary Native American education in the United States with its historical legacy of ideological management and vocational training, is grafted upon the broader context of modern public education, an ominous threat appears for indigenous communities. What happens to the nature of public education when two principal homogenizing forces--the corporation and the public school--become partners, involving business and industry directly in the education of native youth? This thesis examines the history and philosophy behind the corporate presence in United States public education, the nature and extent of contemporary corporate sponsorship in mainstream education, and the implications of such sponsorship for Navajo students in one public school district in northern New Mexico. The research presented finds that the various forms and objectives of corporate-sponsored education, invariably carrying latent marketing agendas, homogenizing forces, and consumerist values, constitute another potential instrument of assimilation of indigenous students.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; Education, History of.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fox, Mary Jo Tippeconnic

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGlobalization and the corporate sponsorship of Navajo education: New perspectives on assimilationen_US
dc.creatorJuliani, Richard Parkeren_US
dc.contributor.authorJuliani, Richard Parkeren_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhen contemporary Native American education in the United States with its historical legacy of ideological management and vocational training, is grafted upon the broader context of modern public education, an ominous threat appears for indigenous communities. What happens to the nature of public education when two principal homogenizing forces--the corporation and the public school--become partners, involving business and industry directly in the education of native youth? This thesis examines the history and philosophy behind the corporate presence in United States public education, the nature and extent of contemporary corporate sponsorship in mainstream education, and the implications of such sponsorship for Navajo students in one public school district in northern New Mexico. The research presented finds that the various forms and objectives of corporate-sponsored education, invariably carrying latent marketing agendas, homogenizing forces, and consumerist values, constitute another potential instrument of assimilation of indigenous students.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, History of.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFox, Mary Jo Tippeconnicen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1395270en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39652294en_US
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