Bridging the gap between dance and theatre: A physical approach to teaching theatre at a secondary level

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278689
Title:
Bridging the gap between dance and theatre: A physical approach to teaching theatre at a secondary level
Author:
Heald, Lorie Elizabeth
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The body has within it an intelligent force, a cognitive power, which deserves recognition. This cognitive power is defined in this thesis as physical cognition, a way of knowing, learning, and responding that occurs within the body and comes from the body. There is currently an imbalance in the relationship between mental and physical cognition in secondary education. This imbalance has permeated Western thought since Descartes claimed that the thinking being is separate from the bodily being. With requirements for physical education and fine arts at the bare minimum, there is a need for physical engagement in learning in secondary education. Offering a teaching model that includes movement, acting, and Anne Bogart's Viewpoints, this model provides a step by step plan for both teaching theatre from a physical perspective and developing physical cognition. It is through this integration of mind and body that education of the whole person begins.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dance.; Theater.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Theatre Arts
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dox, Donnalee; McCammon, Laura

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBridging the gap between dance and theatre: A physical approach to teaching theatre at a secondary levelen_US
dc.creatorHeald, Lorie Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeald, Lorie Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe body has within it an intelligent force, a cognitive power, which deserves recognition. This cognitive power is defined in this thesis as physical cognition, a way of knowing, learning, and responding that occurs within the body and comes from the body. There is currently an imbalance in the relationship between mental and physical cognition in secondary education. This imbalance has permeated Western thought since Descartes claimed that the thinking being is separate from the bodily being. With requirements for physical education and fine arts at the bare minimum, there is a need for physical engagement in learning in secondary education. Offering a teaching model that includes movement, acting, and Anne Bogart's Viewpoints, this model provides a step by step plan for both teaching theatre from a physical perspective and developing physical cognition. It is through this integration of mind and body that education of the whole person begins.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDance.en_US
dc.subjectTheater.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTheatre Artsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDox, Donnaleeen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcCammon, Lauraen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1395265en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39648485en_US
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