Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278687
Title:
Burrow selection by burrowing owls in an urban environment
Author:
Estabrook, Tracy Starr
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I surveyed parts of Tucson, Arizona to determine numbers of burrowing owl (Speotyto cunicularia) burrows present, identify characteristics associated with burrow sites, and assess reproductive success. I measured habitat characteristics at 48 winter, 58 breeding, and 48 random burrows. Random burrows were closer to perches (P) and farther from wash banks (P) than were active burrows, and had smaller entrance dimensions (P). Winter burrows were farther from human activity than were breeding burrows (P). Active sites had less total vegetation, and less visual obscurity than did random sites. Owls may have selected open sites to facilitate detection of predators or prey. Urbanization sometimes created conditions which appeared to attract owls, but also destroyed burrows. An average of 2.31 young fledged from 116 active burrows during 1997-1998. While comparable to other studies of burrowing owls occupying urban environments, this was lower than rates typically reported for the species.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Zoology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mannan, R. William

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBurrow selection by burrowing owls in an urban environmenten_US
dc.creatorEstabrook, Tracy Starren_US
dc.contributor.authorEstabrook, Tracy Starren_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI surveyed parts of Tucson, Arizona to determine numbers of burrowing owl (Speotyto cunicularia) burrows present, identify characteristics associated with burrow sites, and assess reproductive success. I measured habitat characteristics at 48 winter, 58 breeding, and 48 random burrows. Random burrows were closer to perches (P) and farther from wash banks (P) than were active burrows, and had smaller entrance dimensions (P). Winter burrows were farther from human activity than were breeding burrows (P). Active sites had less total vegetation, and less visual obscurity than did random sites. Owls may have selected open sites to facilitate detection of predators or prey. Urbanization sometimes created conditions which appeared to attract owls, but also destroyed burrows. An average of 2.31 young fledged from 116 active burrows during 1997-1998. While comparable to other studies of burrowing owls occupying urban environments, this was lower than rates typically reported for the species.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Zoology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMannan, R. Williamen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1394137en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39568064en_US
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