Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278669
Title:
Self-efficacy, stress, and adjustment in Latino college students
Author:
Natera, Lucia, 1973-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to apply a diathesis-stress model to the study of Latino self-efficacy and college adjustment. Specifically, it was of interest to determine whether self-efficacy or its subcomponents would buffer Latino students from the effects of stress in college adjustment or its subcomponents. The sample consisted of 144 Latino undergraduate students. Results suggest that although self-efficacy and its subcomponents had a large effect on adjustment and its subcomponents, they were not found to buffer stress. Hence a diathesis-stress model was not supported. Academic self-efficacy did buffer the effects of stress in predicting academic success, and was supportive of a partial diathesis-stress model. Implications of these findings include promoting the importance of having high self-efficacy and attempting to instill it in Latino youth through the educational system.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Bilingual and Multicultural.; Education, Educational Psychology.; Psychology, Clinical.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Domino, George

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSelf-efficacy, stress, and adjustment in Latino college studentsen_US
dc.creatorNatera, Lucia, 1973-en_US
dc.contributor.authorNatera, Lucia, 1973-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to apply a diathesis-stress model to the study of Latino self-efficacy and college adjustment. Specifically, it was of interest to determine whether self-efficacy or its subcomponents would buffer Latino students from the effects of stress in college adjustment or its subcomponents. The sample consisted of 144 Latino undergraduate students. Results suggest that although self-efficacy and its subcomponents had a large effect on adjustment and its subcomponents, they were not found to buffer stress. Hence a diathesis-stress model was not supported. Academic self-efficacy did buffer the effects of stress in predicting academic success, and was supportive of a partial diathesis-stress model. Implications of these findings include promoting the importance of having high self-efficacy and attempting to instill it in Latino youth through the educational system.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Bilingual and Multicultural.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDomino, Georgeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1391062en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38822994en_US
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