Bird-habitat relationships along a vegetation gradient in desert grasslands of the southwest

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278668
Title:
Bird-habitat relationships along a vegetation gradient in desert grasslands of the southwest
Author:
Downard, Giselle Teresa, 1966-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
During winter 1996-1997 and summer 1997, I studied bird assemblages along a vegetation gradient in desert grasslands of southeast Arizona and southwest New Mexico. A gradient of increasing woody cover and decreasing grass cover best described the variance in vegetation characteristics among sites. At larger scales of observation, I found woody plant characteristics had a large effect on the presence and distribution of individual species and assemblages. At finer scales of analysis, I found a greater proportion of relationships between birds and particular plant species. Bird species richness was positively related to shrub species richness during winter. I observed greater between season shifts in bird species richness among sites with >1.0% woody cover. Total bird abundance varied little between seasons except at sites with 1.0% woody cover. Woody plant levels below 10% and 20% are likely to increase populations of plains and semidesert grassland bird communities respectively.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Biostatistics.; Biology, Ecology.; Environmental Sciences.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Morrison, Michael L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBird-habitat relationships along a vegetation gradient in desert grasslands of the southwesten_US
dc.creatorDownard, Giselle Teresa, 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorDownard, Giselle Teresa, 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDuring winter 1996-1997 and summer 1997, I studied bird assemblages along a vegetation gradient in desert grasslands of southeast Arizona and southwest New Mexico. A gradient of increasing woody cover and decreasing grass cover best described the variance in vegetation characteristics among sites. At larger scales of observation, I found woody plant characteristics had a large effect on the presence and distribution of individual species and assemblages. At finer scales of analysis, I found a greater proportion of relationships between birds and particular plant species. Bird species richness was positively related to shrub species richness during winter. I observed greater between season shifts in bird species richness among sites with >1.0% woody cover. Total bird abundance varied little between seasons except at sites with 1.0% woody cover. Woody plant levels below 10% and 20% are likely to increase populations of plains and semidesert grassland bird communities respectively.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Biostatistics.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMorrison, Michael L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1391061en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38804104en_US
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