Head injury outcomes evaluation of a bicycle helmet law for children

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278664
Title:
Head injury outcomes evaluation of a bicycle helmet law for children
Author:
Judkins, Daniel Glen, 1950-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Background. Bicycle helmets are 85% effective in protecting against head injury. The City of Tucson enacted an ordinance requiring children to wear a helmet. This quasi-experimental, population-based study evaluates this law's effectiveness. Hypotheses. Primary hypothesis: There will be a significant decrease in head injury occurrence in children after the helmet law. Secondary hypothesis H₂: There will be a significant decrease in head injury severity. Secondary hypothesis H₃: There will be a significant decrease in fatality due to head injury. Data collection. Trauma center trauma registry data, the hospital discharge data from other Tucson hospitals, and the medical examiner's case files. Data analysis. Chi square analysis of the proportion of head injury to all bike injuries, pre and post, revealed a significant drop in head injuries, confirming the primary hypothesis. Other analyses revealed a reduction in injury, but not to significant levels. Conclusion. The helmet law is effective.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Public Health.; Transportation.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Epidemiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lebowitz, Michael D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHead injury outcomes evaluation of a bicycle helmet law for childrenen_US
dc.creatorJudkins, Daniel Glen, 1950-en_US
dc.contributor.authorJudkins, Daniel Glen, 1950-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground. Bicycle helmets are 85% effective in protecting against head injury. The City of Tucson enacted an ordinance requiring children to wear a helmet. This quasi-experimental, population-based study evaluates this law's effectiveness. Hypotheses. Primary hypothesis: There will be a significant decrease in head injury occurrence in children after the helmet law. Secondary hypothesis H₂: There will be a significant decrease in head injury severity. Secondary hypothesis H₃: There will be a significant decrease in fatality due to head injury. Data collection. Trauma center trauma registry data, the hospital discharge data from other Tucson hospitals, and the medical examiner's case files. Data analysis. Chi square analysis of the proportion of head injury to all bike injuries, pre and post, revealed a significant drop in head injuries, confirming the primary hypothesis. Other analyses revealed a reduction in injury, but not to significant levels. Conclusion. The helmet law is effective.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
dc.subjectTransportation.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEpidemiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLebowitz, Michael D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1389598en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38649998en_US
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