Let's get real: Adding an accountability layer to the minimal group paradigm

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278661
Title:
Let's get real: Adding an accountability layer to the minimal group paradigm
Author:
Dobbs, Michael Randolph, 1972-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Since its inception in the early 1970s, the minimal group paradigm (MGP) has proved a popular method of testing intergroup phenomena. In addition, the paradigm supplied early evidence that led to the formation of Tajfel and Turner's (1979, 1986) Social Identity Theory. The original studies utilizing the MGP were developed to find a baseline intergroup situation that produced ingroup favoritism. Later minimal group studies confirmed a mere categorization effect--that is, simply categorizing subjects into one of two groups, even on a trivial basis, was enough to bring on discriminatory behavior. The present study seeks to clarify the mere categorization phenomenon. A minimal group scenario in some ways represents an intergroup environment in which discrimination is fostered. It is suggested that subjects who believe they will have to justify their allocation decisions to others will be less likely to exhibit ingroup-favoring behavior. In addition to typical minimal group findings of discrimination under non-accountable conditions, results also show that the presence of accountability eliminates discrimination under conditions of high ingroup status and majority ingroup standing. Discriminatory behavior is revived when the ingroup is in a numerical minority.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Behavioral.; Psychology, Social.; Psychology, Experimental.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Crano, William D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleLet's get real: Adding an accountability layer to the minimal group paradigmen_US
dc.creatorDobbs, Michael Randolph, 1972-en_US
dc.contributor.authorDobbs, Michael Randolph, 1972-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSince its inception in the early 1970s, the minimal group paradigm (MGP) has proved a popular method of testing intergroup phenomena. In addition, the paradigm supplied early evidence that led to the formation of Tajfel and Turner's (1979, 1986) Social Identity Theory. The original studies utilizing the MGP were developed to find a baseline intergroup situation that produced ingroup favoritism. Later minimal group studies confirmed a mere categorization effect--that is, simply categorizing subjects into one of two groups, even on a trivial basis, was enough to bring on discriminatory behavior. The present study seeks to clarify the mere categorization phenomenon. A minimal group scenario in some ways represents an intergroup environment in which discrimination is fostered. It is suggested that subjects who believe they will have to justify their allocation decisions to others will be less likely to exhibit ingroup-favoring behavior. In addition to typical minimal group findings of discrimination under non-accountable conditions, results also show that the presence of accountability eliminates discrimination under conditions of high ingroup status and majority ingroup standing. Discriminatory behavior is revived when the ingroup is in a numerical minority.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Experimental.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCrano, William D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1389595en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38646870en_US
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