Place learning in real and computer-generated space: Performance of younger and older adults

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278644
Title:
Place learning in real and computer-generated space: Performance of younger and older adults
Author:
Laurance, Holly Elizabeth
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In accordance with spatial mapping theory and findings from the Morris Water Maze (WMW), we predicted that older humans would differ from younger humans on a place learning task. Using a computerized version of the MWM entitled the Computer-Generated Arena, we compared performance of adults 22-29 years of age (yoa) with adults 64-81 yoa. We found that 22-29 yoa adults located an invisible target more quickly and accurately than 64-81 yoa adults. Additionally, removing sets of distal stimuli severely disrupted performance in 64-81 yoa adults, but not 22-29 yoa adults. In a post C-G Arena puzzle task, both groups of adults accurately recreated the spatial configurations of stimuli, but the 64-81 yoa adults did not place the target accurately within that space. This suggests that 64-81 yoa adults can accurately map a novel space but may not be able to place learn. These results correlate highly with performance in a real-world MWM task testing the same population.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Gerontology.; Psychology, Behavioral.; Psychology, Clinical.; Psychology, Cognitive.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jacobs, W. Jake

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePlace learning in real and computer-generated space: Performance of younger and older adultsen_US
dc.creatorLaurance, Holly Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaurance, Holly Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn accordance with spatial mapping theory and findings from the Morris Water Maze (WMW), we predicted that older humans would differ from younger humans on a place learning task. Using a computerized version of the MWM entitled the Computer-Generated Arena, we compared performance of adults 22-29 years of age (yoa) with adults 64-81 yoa. We found that 22-29 yoa adults located an invisible target more quickly and accurately than 64-81 yoa adults. Additionally, removing sets of distal stimuli severely disrupted performance in 64-81 yoa adults, but not 22-29 yoa adults. In a post C-G Arena puzzle task, both groups of adults accurately recreated the spatial configurations of stimuli, but the 64-81 yoa adults did not place the target accurately within that space. This suggests that 64-81 yoa adults can accurately map a novel space but may not be able to place learn. These results correlate highly with performance in a real-world MWM task testing the same population.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGerontology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJacobs, W. Jakeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1387969en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38269065en_US
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