Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278636
Title:
Desert mule deer use of a corridor and surrounding habitats
Author:
Tull, John Christopher, 1970-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I examined the efficacy of a mitigation project in Avra Valley, Arizona that was established to provide wildlife access across the barrier created by the Central Arizona Project aqueduct. I monitored movements of 17 radiocollared desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) to determine if deer were using the corridor for access across the aqueduct and the 26 km wide valley. I also examined deer use of vegetation associations and proximity to landscape features. Four deer crossed the canal but stayed within 500 m of the crossing site. One deer traversed the valley via the corridor. Overall, 22.4% of deer locations were in the corridor land system. Female mule deer generally used the mesquite (Prosopis velutina)-burroweed (Isocoma tenuisecta) vegetation association more than it was available and the palo verde (Cercidium spp.)-mixed cacti association less than it was available. Female deer were generally closer to the CAP, housing developments, roads, and permanent water than random points.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.Sc.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Krausman, Paul R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDesert mule deer use of a corridor and surrounding habitatsen_US
dc.creatorTull, John Christopher, 1970-en_US
dc.contributor.authorTull, John Christopher, 1970-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI examined the efficacy of a mitigation project in Avra Valley, Arizona that was established to provide wildlife access across the barrier created by the Central Arizona Project aqueduct. I monitored movements of 17 radiocollared desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) to determine if deer were using the corridor for access across the aqueduct and the 26 km wide valley. I also examined deer use of vegetation associations and proximity to landscape features. Four deer crossed the canal but stayed within 500 m of the crossing site. One deer traversed the valley via the corridor. Overall, 22.4% of deer locations were in the corridor land system. Female mule deer generally used the mesquite (Prosopis velutina)-burroweed (Isocoma tenuisecta) vegetation association more than it was available and the palo verde (Cercidium spp.)-mixed cacti association less than it was available. Female deer were generally closer to the CAP, housing developments, roads, and permanent water than random points.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.Sc.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKrausman, Paul R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1387960en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3826819xen_US
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