Fire histories of upper elevation forests in the Gila Wilderness, New Mexico via fire scar and stand age structure analyses

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278601
Title:
Fire histories of upper elevation forests in the Gila Wilderness, New Mexico via fire scar and stand age structure analyses
Author:
Abolt, Rena Ann Peck, 1968-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Fire scar analysis to identify fire events and stand age structure analysis to identify fire effects on survivorship of trees were used to reconstruct surface and crown fire regimes in upper elevation forests of the Gila Wilderness, NM. Fire regimes varied across forest type, but not necessarily across elevation. Prior to the twentieth century, (from 1706 to 1904), the mean return interval for large fires was 8 years. During the twentieth century, (from 1904 to 1995), the mean fire return interval for large fires was 46 years. The virtual end of historically frequent fire regimes due to livestock grazing and fire suppression since the turn of the century has affected successional pathways of forest types across elevations, favoring later successional forest species and structures.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable natural resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Swetnam, Thomas W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFire histories of upper elevation forests in the Gila Wilderness, New Mexico via fire scar and stand age structure analysesen_US
dc.creatorAbolt, Rena Ann Peck, 1968-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAbolt, Rena Ann Peck, 1968-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFire scar analysis to identify fire events and stand age structure analysis to identify fire effects on survivorship of trees were used to reconstruct surface and crown fire regimes in upper elevation forests of the Gila Wilderness, NM. Fire regimes varied across forest type, but not necessarily across elevation. Prior to the twentieth century, (from 1706 to 1904), the mean return interval for large fires was 8 years. During the twentieth century, (from 1904 to 1995), the mean fire return interval for large fires was 46 years. The virtual end of historically frequent fire regimes due to livestock grazing and fire suppression since the turn of the century has affected successional pathways of forest types across elevations, favoring later successional forest species and structures.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable natural resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSwetnam, Thomas W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1385739en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37459491en_US
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