Self-care and self-medication practices in two California Mexican communities: Migrant farm worker families and border residents in San Diego County

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278600
Title:
Self-care and self-medication practices in two California Mexican communities: Migrant farm worker families and border residents in San Diego County
Author:
Pylypa, Jennifer Jean, 1969-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Although medical anthropologists have recently taken up the study of medication use in both developing and developed nations, the medication practices of immigrants remain unstudied. The current research reports on self-medication practices among two California Mexican immigrant communities: immigrant families living along the California-Mexico border, and migrant farm worker families residing in illegal encampments and substandard housing in San Diego's North County. Medication and health seeking practices are found to be influenced by both political-economic forces, and the sociocultural context in which California Mexicans live. The U.S.-Mexico border area is considered as a special context for self-medication, since it permits border-crossing into Tijuana for the purpose of buying Mexican pharmaceuticals at low cost without a prescription. The popularity of injections and the cross-border purchasing of injectable antibiotics and vitamins are discussed as a case study.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; Health Sciences, Public Health.; Sociology, Public and Social Welfare.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nichter, Mark A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSelf-care and self-medication practices in two California Mexican communities: Migrant farm worker families and border residents in San Diego Countyen_US
dc.creatorPylypa, Jennifer Jean, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPylypa, Jennifer Jean, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough medical anthropologists have recently taken up the study of medication use in both developing and developed nations, the medication practices of immigrants remain unstudied. The current research reports on self-medication practices among two California Mexican immigrant communities: immigrant families living along the California-Mexico border, and migrant farm worker families residing in illegal encampments and substandard housing in San Diego's North County. Medication and health seeking practices are found to be influenced by both political-economic forces, and the sociocultural context in which California Mexicans live. The U.S.-Mexico border area is considered as a special context for self-medication, since it permits border-crossing into Tijuana for the purpose of buying Mexican pharmaceuticals at low cost without a prescription. The popularity of injections and the cross-border purchasing of injectable antibiotics and vitamins are discussed as a case study.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Public and Social Welfare.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNichter, Mark A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1385737en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37459302en_US
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