Professional nursing practice in medical-surgical and intensive care units: Baseline comparisons

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278593
Title:
Professional nursing practice in medical-surgical and intensive care units: Baseline comparisons
Author:
Chard, Jennifer Clarissa, 1963-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study had three purposes: (1) to examine the differences and similarities between intensive care and medical-surgical RNs' self-reports of professional nursing practice and job satisfaction. (2 & 3) to explore the influence of professional nursing practice on nurse satisfaction in intensive care RNs and medical-surgical RNs, respectively. A two-group, cross-sectional descriptive design with a sample of 340 RNs was utilized to perform a secondary analysis of baseline data from the Differentiated Group Professional Practice project. Self-reports of RNs evidenced significantly higher levels of autonomy and control over nursing practice among intensive care subjects as opposed to medical-surgical subjects. The concepts of organizational commitment, autonomy, control over nursing practice, and group cohesion had a positive influence on total job satisfaction for the medical-surgical subjects. The above concepts with the exception of autonomy had a positive influence on total job satisfaction for the intensive care subjects.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nursing.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Verran, Joyce A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleProfessional nursing practice in medical-surgical and intensive care units: Baseline comparisonsen_US
dc.creatorChard, Jennifer Clarissa, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorChard, Jennifer Clarissa, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study had three purposes: (1) to examine the differences and similarities between intensive care and medical-surgical RNs' self-reports of professional nursing practice and job satisfaction. (2 & 3) to explore the influence of professional nursing practice on nurse satisfaction in intensive care RNs and medical-surgical RNs, respectively. A two-group, cross-sectional descriptive design with a sample of 340 RNs was utilized to perform a secondary analysis of baseline data from the Differentiated Group Professional Practice project. Self-reports of RNs evidenced significantly higher levels of autonomy and control over nursing practice among intensive care subjects as opposed to medical-surgical subjects. The concepts of organizational commitment, autonomy, control over nursing practice, and group cohesion had a positive influence on total job satisfaction for the medical-surgical subjects. The above concepts with the exception of autonomy had a positive influence on total job satisfaction for the intensive care subjects.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVerran, Joyce A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1341465en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26362843en_US
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