Plains Indian Sign Language: A comparative study of alternate and primary signers

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278590
Title:
Plains Indian Sign Language: A comparative study of alternate and primary signers
Author:
McKay-Cody, Melanie Raylene, 1962-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
An extensive literature review has been undertaken to create an accurate portrayal of North American Indian Sign Language as used by both deaf and hearing American Indians. Historical accounts are stressed as the primary source for understanding the extent of signed language use among the American Indians of North American and its decline to the present status as an endangered language. This sign language has functioned in two significant ways: (1) primarily (for hearing tribal members) as an alternative to the spoken language and (2) as a primary, or first language for deaf tribal members. It is critical to bear this distinction in mind for future investigations into the linguistic status of North American Indian Sign Language. Additional historical accounts related to American Indians' encounters with the signed language use among Deaf Anglos are also included. An ongoing research project involving the preservation of old film in which North American Indian Sign Language has been documented in 1930s and the current data collection of deaf NAISL signer is discussed as a potential source for future research and as a viable access to the heritage of American Indians.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Bilingual and Multicultural.; Language, Linguistics.; Speech Communication.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special education and rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Supalla, Samuel J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePlains Indian Sign Language: A comparative study of alternate and primary signersen_US
dc.creatorMcKay-Cody, Melanie Raylene, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKay-Cody, Melanie Raylene, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAn extensive literature review has been undertaken to create an accurate portrayal of North American Indian Sign Language as used by both deaf and hearing American Indians. Historical accounts are stressed as the primary source for understanding the extent of signed language use among the American Indians of North American and its decline to the present status as an endangered language. This sign language has functioned in two significant ways: (1) primarily (for hearing tribal members) as an alternative to the spoken language and (2) as a primary, or first language for deaf tribal members. It is critical to bear this distinction in mind for future investigations into the linguistic status of North American Indian Sign Language. Additional historical accounts related to American Indians' encounters with the signed language use among Deaf Anglos are also included. An ongoing research project involving the preservation of old film in which North American Indian Sign Language has been documented in 1930s and the current data collection of deaf NAISL signer is discussed as a potential source for future research and as a viable access to the heritage of American Indians.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Bilingual and Multicultural.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Linguistics.en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial education and rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSupalla, Samuel J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1384554en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34817220en_US
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