Nutritional biology of the turtle ant, Zacryptocerus rohweri, morphological specializations of the digestive tract and associated behaviors

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278578
Title:
Nutritional biology of the turtle ant, Zacryptocerus rohweri, morphological specializations of the digestive tract and associated behaviors
Author:
Roche, Robin Kimberly, 1962-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Turtle Ant, Zacryptocerus rohweri, is an arboreal, polydomous ant commonly nesting in the dead branches of Palo Verde. Colonies are small with a dimorphic worker caste. Their diet was observed to be primarily liquid, but pollen may also be important. Behavioral studies revealed a high degree of both oral and abdominal trophallaxis. The morphology of the digestive tract of Z. rohweri is also described. The proventriculus is covered with clusters of small spines which act as a fine filter of food. Ultrastructural study reveals bacteria amongst the microvilli of midgut epithelial cells. The hindgut consists of an enlarged pouch filled with large masses of bacteria of three major morphotypes. Newly emerged individuals appear to acquire these microorganisms through abdominal trophallaxis of older workers in the colony. The hypothesis that abdominal trophallaxis is a means of transferring hindgut bacteria which may add important nutrients to their limited diet is proposed.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Entomology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Entomology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNutritional biology of the turtle ant, Zacryptocerus rohweri, morphological specializations of the digestive tract and associated behaviorsen_US
dc.creatorRoche, Robin Kimberly, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRoche, Robin Kimberly, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Turtle Ant, Zacryptocerus rohweri, is an arboreal, polydomous ant commonly nesting in the dead branches of Palo Verde. Colonies are small with a dimorphic worker caste. Their diet was observed to be primarily liquid, but pollen may also be important. Behavioral studies revealed a high degree of both oral and abdominal trophallaxis. The morphology of the digestive tract of Z. rohweri is also described. The proventriculus is covered with clusters of small spines which act as a fine filter of food. Ultrastructural study reveals bacteria amongst the microvilli of midgut epithelial cells. The hindgut consists of an enlarged pouch filled with large masses of bacteria of three major morphotypes. Newly emerged individuals appear to acquire these microorganisms through abdominal trophallaxis of older workers in the colony. The hypothesis that abdominal trophallaxis is a means of transferring hindgut bacteria which may add important nutrients to their limited diet is proposed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Entomology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1383576en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34608114en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.