Storage and its implications for the advent of rice agriculture in Korea: Konam-ri

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278577
Title:
Storage and its implications for the advent of rice agriculture in Korea: Konam-ri
Author:
Norton, Christopher John, 1971-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Even though archaeology is an expanding field in Korea attempts at reconstructing subsistence strategies in the Neolithic and Bronze Age are few (e.g. Sample 1974; An 1991a). Research directed towards explaining change in subsistence patterns are even fewer. The attempt is made here, through faunal analysis, to address the latter question. There is unambiguous variation in subsistence strategies in the Korean Neolithic and Bronze Age. During the former cultural stage, inhabitants relied heavily on wild game and fish, but by the Bronze Age subsistence shifted towards rice agriculture. The site of Konam-ri, located off the west coast of the Korean Peninsula, contains both Neolithic (ca. 1,500 B.C.) and Bronze Age (800-500 B.C.) occupations. Based on comparative study, the faunal remains associated with the two occupations suggests the subsistence strategies differed markedly. It is argued in this thesis that increasing population pressure may have been the causal factor leading to the change in subsistence.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Olsen, John W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleStorage and its implications for the advent of rice agriculture in Korea: Konam-rien_US
dc.creatorNorton, Christopher John, 1971-en_US
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Christopher John, 1971-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEven though archaeology is an expanding field in Korea attempts at reconstructing subsistence strategies in the Neolithic and Bronze Age are few (e.g. Sample 1974; An 1991a). Research directed towards explaining change in subsistence patterns are even fewer. The attempt is made here, through faunal analysis, to address the latter question. There is unambiguous variation in subsistence strategies in the Korean Neolithic and Bronze Age. During the former cultural stage, inhabitants relied heavily on wild game and fish, but by the Bronze Age subsistence shifted towards rice agriculture. The site of Konam-ri, located off the west coast of the Korean Peninsula, contains both Neolithic (ca. 1,500 B.C.) and Bronze Age (800-500 B.C.) occupations. Based on comparative study, the faunal remains associated with the two occupations suggests the subsistence strategies differed markedly. It is argued in this thesis that increasing population pressure may have been the causal factor leading to the change in subsistence.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOlsen, John W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1383571en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34601533en_US
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