Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278572
Title:
Experimental study of residency and emigration in house mice
Author:
Johnson, Cameron Laurence, 1969-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I used enclosures with exits for emigration to test whether house mice could regulate their numbers by emigration to two levels of resources. Exits had a water obstacle likley to be crossed only by true emigrants. Enclosures had excess food and water and the number of shelters was held constant. I introduced a pair of mice into enclosures about every other night, until no more would become residents. I ran 7 trials in single enclosures and 8 in double enclosures (2 single enclosures joined with a tunnel). The number of mice that stayed within a given size enclosure was consistant, and was 2.3 times higher in double enclosures than in single enclosures. Weather, predation, starvation, and disease did not act in any trials. My data support the contention that house mice can control their population numbers through spacing and emigration.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Matter, William J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleExperimental study of residency and emigration in house miceen_US
dc.creatorJohnson, Cameron Laurence, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Cameron Laurence, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI used enclosures with exits for emigration to test whether house mice could regulate their numbers by emigration to two levels of resources. Exits had a water obstacle likley to be crossed only by true emigrants. Enclosures had excess food and water and the number of shelters was held constant. I introduced a pair of mice into enclosures about every other night, until no more would become residents. I ran 7 trials in single enclosures and 8 in double enclosures (2 single enclosures joined with a tunnel). The number of mice that stayed within a given size enclosure was consistant, and was 2.3 times higher in double enclosures than in single enclosures. Weather, predation, starvation, and disease did not act in any trials. My data support the contention that house mice can control their population numbers through spacing and emigration.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMatter, William J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1383563en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34568104en_US
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