Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278557
Title:
Appropriation of a Native American symbol: From sacred to profane
Author:
Seneshen, Laura Kaye, 1946-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This Thesis asks the question of whether of not the appropriation of a Native American symbol by the dominant culture constitutes a profanity. The history of so called "Medicine Wheels" is examined, while looking at their possible uses in prehistoric times and how they are used today by both cultures. Duplicative ceremonies, conducted by those professing to be "Medicine Men/Women" are examined in a context of ethics, backed by the voices of the Native American community.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stauss, Jay

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAppropriation of a Native American symbol: From sacred to profaneen_US
dc.creatorSeneshen, Laura Kaye, 1946-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSeneshen, Laura Kaye, 1946-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis Thesis asks the question of whether of not the appropriation of a Native American symbol by the dominant culture constitutes a profanity. The history of so called "Medicine Wheels" is examined, while looking at their possible uses in prehistoric times and how they are used today by both cultures. Duplicative ceremonies, conducted by those professing to be "Medicine Men/Women" are examined in a context of ethics, backed by the voices of the Native American community.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStauss, Jayen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1381947en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3430518xen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.