Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278553
Title:
Supplementing traditional chemical education on the World Wide Web
Author:
Parrill, Abby Louise, 1970-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Emerging technologies provide impetus for supplements to the way chemistry is taught. Students of the current generation are conditioned to expect high-quality visual images to reinforce other informational media. Multimedia teaching tools can take advantage of this pre-conditioning. The World Wide Web (WWW) provides new opportunities for multimedia distribution. Supplemental materials for chemical education have been developed to take advantage of these emerging technologies. Molecular animations have been developed for use in lecture and for distribution via the WWW. These animations were designed to demonstrate chemistry from a "Big Picture" view. Interactive, exploratory tutorials have also been developed as student study aids. These tutorials promote concept understanding within a hands-on, trial-and-error atmosphere. The WWW has also been utilized as a low-cost avenue for implementation of a laboratory exercise emphasizing the importance of chemical structure and its impact upon chemical reactivity through computational chemistry.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Technology of.; Education, Sciences.
Degree Name:
M.Sc.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gervay, Jacquelyn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSupplementing traditional chemical education on the World Wide Weben_US
dc.creatorParrill, Abby Louise, 1970-en_US
dc.contributor.authorParrill, Abby Louise, 1970-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEmerging technologies provide impetus for supplements to the way chemistry is taught. Students of the current generation are conditioned to expect high-quality visual images to reinforce other informational media. Multimedia teaching tools can take advantage of this pre-conditioning. The World Wide Web (WWW) provides new opportunities for multimedia distribution. Supplemental materials for chemical education have been developed to take advantage of these emerging technologies. Molecular animations have been developed for use in lecture and for distribution via the WWW. These animations were designed to demonstrate chemistry from a "Big Picture" view. Interactive, exploratory tutorials have also been developed as student study aids. These tutorials promote concept understanding within a hands-on, trial-and-error atmosphere. The WWW has also been utilized as a low-cost avenue for implementation of a laboratory exercise emphasizing the importance of chemical structure and its impact upon chemical reactivity through computational chemistry.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Technology of.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Sciences.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.Sc.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGervay, Jacquelynen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1381794en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34305191en_US
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