Small mammal abundance within Mexican spotted owl home ranges in the Manti-LaSal National Forest, San Juan County, Utah

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278552
Title:
Small mammal abundance within Mexican spotted owl home ranges in the Manti-LaSal National Forest, San Juan County, Utah
Author:
Sureda, Maite, 1966-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Ecologists suspect that owls select specific areas based on prey availability. My objective was to determine and compare distributions and abundances of Mexican spotted owl prey species' within different vegetation types in the canyons and mesas of the Manti-LaSal National Forest in Utah. I conducted live-trapping during summer and fall, 1994-95. Woodrat species (Neotoma spp.) are the Mexican spotted owls primary prey species as determined by percent biomass. Peromyscus spp. are also important in terms of frequency. Woodrats were only captured in the canyons and were primarily captured within the pinyon (Pinus spp.) - juniper (Juniperus spp.) vegetation type. The Mexican spotted owls in southeastern Utah spend >75% of their time within the canyons and forage within pinyon-juniper stands in the canyons. Maintaining the present state of pinyon-juniper stands within the canyons may benefit Mexican spotted owl populations in the Manti-LaSal National Forest.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.Sc.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Morrison, Michael L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSmall mammal abundance within Mexican spotted owl home ranges in the Manti-LaSal National Forest, San Juan County, Utahen_US
dc.creatorSureda, Maite, 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSureda, Maite, 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEcologists suspect that owls select specific areas based on prey availability. My objective was to determine and compare distributions and abundances of Mexican spotted owl prey species' within different vegetation types in the canyons and mesas of the Manti-LaSal National Forest in Utah. I conducted live-trapping during summer and fall, 1994-95. Woodrat species (Neotoma spp.) are the Mexican spotted owls primary prey species as determined by percent biomass. Peromyscus spp. are also important in terms of frequency. Woodrats were only captured in the canyons and were primarily captured within the pinyon (Pinus spp.) - juniper (Juniperus spp.) vegetation type. The Mexican spotted owls in southeastern Utah spend >75% of their time within the canyons and forage within pinyon-juniper stands in the canyons. Maintaining the present state of pinyon-juniper stands within the canyons may benefit Mexican spotted owl populations in the Manti-LaSal National Forest.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.Sc.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMorrison, Michael L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1381792en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34599770en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34296608en_US
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