O-okun Yoruba in Yoruba art historiography: History, problems and prospects

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278548
Title:
O-okun Yoruba in Yoruba art historiography: History, problems and prospects
Author:
Ijagbemi, Bayo, 1963-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One of the most obtrusive features of Yoruba studies has been its clear pattern of regional preferences and biases in its scholarship. This pattern is reflected in the present concentration of studies on the southwest, the northwest, the central subgroups of Ife, Owo, Ijesha, Egba, Ijebu, Oyo, and Ilorin on one hand, and the paucity of works on the northeast and southeast subgroups of the O-okun Yoruba, the Igbomina, the Ikale and the Ilaje on the other. There is no other subgroup where this particularistic trend in Yoruba studies and especially, art historiography can better be observed than with the scholarly neglect of the O-okun peoples, the most northeasterly of the Yoruba subgroups. An important goal of this thesis is to foreground the multi-culturalistic tendencies among the Yoruba and underscore the necessity to provide comparable scholarly attention to neglected subgroups, the O-okun peoples in particular.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; History, African.; Art History.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Art
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Omari-Obayemi, Mikelle Smith

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleO-okun Yoruba in Yoruba art historiography: History, problems and prospectsen_US
dc.creatorIjagbemi, Bayo, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorIjagbemi, Bayo, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne of the most obtrusive features of Yoruba studies has been its clear pattern of regional preferences and biases in its scholarship. This pattern is reflected in the present concentration of studies on the southwest, the northwest, the central subgroups of Ife, Owo, Ijesha, Egba, Ijebu, Oyo, and Ilorin on one hand, and the paucity of works on the northeast and southeast subgroups of the O-okun Yoruba, the Igbomina, the Ikale and the Ilaje on the other. There is no other subgroup where this particularistic trend in Yoruba studies and especially, art historiography can better be observed than with the scholarly neglect of the O-okun peoples, the most northeasterly of the Yoruba subgroups. An important goal of this thesis is to foreground the multi-culturalistic tendencies among the Yoruba and underscore the necessity to provide comparable scholarly attention to neglected subgroups, the O-okun peoples in particular.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, African.en_US
dc.subjectArt History.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArten_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOmari-Obayemi, Mikelle Smithen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1381785en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34288089en_US
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