Selenium uptake and it's effect on growth of carrots, squash, and sudan grass

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278544
Title:
Selenium uptake and it's effect on growth of carrots, squash, and sudan grass
Author:
Algharaibeh, Mamoun A., 1969-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to study the amount of selenium accumulation and the effect of selenite on growth of carrots, squash, and sudan grass. Selenium was added to sandy soil as sodium selenite at five rates (0.02, 0.08, 0.32, 1.28, and 5 mgn) in a randomized complete block design including a control, in three replicates. Addition of 5 mg/l selenium reduced the total biomass (in carrots and squash) as much as 97% and as much as 85% in sudan grass. Crops in the control treatment and those exposed to 0.02 mg/l did not accumulate selenium to levels considered toxic to animals and humans. All other treatments resulted in levels of accumulation that could pose hazards when consumed by animals and humans. Based on the interpolated irrigation concentration that caused 50% yield reduction (observed data), sudan grass was the most tolerant crop (4.0 mg/l)while squash plants were the least tolerant (0.9 mg/l) and carrots were intermediate (2.2 mg/l).
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Plant Physiology.
Degree Name:
M.Sc.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Soil Water and Environmental Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Glenn, Edward P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSelenium uptake and it's effect on growth of carrots, squash, and sudan grassen_US
dc.creatorAlgharaibeh, Mamoun A., 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAlgharaibeh, Mamoun A., 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to study the amount of selenium accumulation and the effect of selenite on growth of carrots, squash, and sudan grass. Selenium was added to sandy soil as sodium selenite at five rates (0.02, 0.08, 0.32, 1.28, and 5 mgn) in a randomized complete block design including a control, in three replicates. Addition of 5 mg/l selenium reduced the total biomass (in carrots and squash) as much as 97% and as much as 85% in sudan grass. Crops in the control treatment and those exposed to 0.02 mg/l did not accumulate selenium to levels considered toxic to animals and humans. All other treatments resulted in levels of accumulation that could pose hazards when consumed by animals and humans. Based on the interpolated irrigation concentration that caused 50% yield reduction (observed data), sudan grass was the most tolerant crop (4.0 mg/l)while squash plants were the least tolerant (0.9 mg/l) and carrots were intermediate (2.2 mg/l).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Plant Physiology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.Sc.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil Water and Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGlenn, Edward P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1381779en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34263329en_US
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