Eighteenth century caste paintings: The implications of Miguel Cabrera's series

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278537
Title:
Eighteenth century caste paintings: The implications of Miguel Cabrera's series
Author:
Arana, Emilia
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examines caste paintings, an art form unique to eighteenth century colonial Mexico. Hundreds of caste paintings were produced, following a compositional template that remained fairly uniform throughout the century. The distinguishing characteristic of these images is their depiction and labeling of Mexico's racially mixed population. A broad discussion of the caste genre places these works in the context of hierarchical colonial society. Focus is on select images by prominent Mexican artist Miguel Cabrera, and the changes Cabrera brings to the caste template. This study places particular emphasis on the women of Cabrera's first two caste paintings, using examples from portraiture and other art forms for contrast. The noble cacique Indian woman of the first image is used as a way to highlight and explore representation of the European and Indian cultures that comprised the major dichotomy of New Spain's social organization.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, Latin American.; Art History.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Art
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Widdifield, Stacie Graham

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEighteenth century caste paintings: The implications of Miguel Cabrera's seriesen_US
dc.creatorArana, Emiliaen_US
dc.contributor.authorArana, Emiliaen_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examines caste paintings, an art form unique to eighteenth century colonial Mexico. Hundreds of caste paintings were produced, following a compositional template that remained fairly uniform throughout the century. The distinguishing characteristic of these images is their depiction and labeling of Mexico's racially mixed population. A broad discussion of the caste genre places these works in the context of hierarchical colonial society. Focus is on select images by prominent Mexican artist Miguel Cabrera, and the changes Cabrera brings to the caste template. This study places particular emphasis on the women of Cabrera's first two caste paintings, using examples from portraiture and other art forms for contrast. The noble cacique Indian woman of the first image is used as a way to highlight and explore representation of the European and Indian cultures that comprised the major dichotomy of New Spain's social organization.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Latin American.en_US
dc.subjectArt History.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArten_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWiddifield, Stacie Grahamen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1378998en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33956868en_US
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