Mechanisms of lower treeline shift: Seed fate of Quercus emoryi acorns

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278530
Title:
Mechanisms of lower treeline shift: Seed fate of Quercus emoryi acorns
Author:
Hubbard, John Andrew, 1969-
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The stability of lower treeline in the southwestern United States has been the subject of recent debate. An understanding of seed predation and dispersal is required to evaluate these predictions. Experimental plots were established along the oak woodland/semi-desert grassland boundary to investigate seed predation and dispersal of emory oak, a common lower treeline species. An aviary experiment investigated acorn selection by grey-breasted jays, important emory oak seed dispersers. I found sufficient acorn dispersal for emory oak recruitment in adjacent grassland, and that seed predation does not limit oak recruitment in adjacent grasslands; in fact, acorns dispersed into adjacent grasslands are more likely to escape predation. I determined that grey-breasted jays select and cache acorns in a manner favorable to oak recruitment. Taken collectively, these studies and other research into emory oak life history stages illustrate mechanisms by which rapid downslope shifts in lower treeline can occur.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.Sc.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McPherson, Guy R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMechanisms of lower treeline shift: Seed fate of Quercus emoryi acornsen_US
dc.creatorHubbard, John Andrew, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHubbard, John Andrew, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe stability of lower treeline in the southwestern United States has been the subject of recent debate. An understanding of seed predation and dispersal is required to evaluate these predictions. Experimental plots were established along the oak woodland/semi-desert grassland boundary to investigate seed predation and dispersal of emory oak, a common lower treeline species. An aviary experiment investigated acorn selection by grey-breasted jays, important emory oak seed dispersers. I found sufficient acorn dispersal for emory oak recruitment in adjacent grassland, and that seed predation does not limit oak recruitment in adjacent grasslands; in fact, acorns dispersed into adjacent grasslands are more likely to escape predation. I determined that grey-breasted jays select and cache acorns in a manner favorable to oak recruitment. Taken collectively, these studies and other research into emory oak life history stages illustrate mechanisms by which rapid downslope shifts in lower treeline can occur.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.Sc.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcPherson, Guy R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1378302en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33851852en_US
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