A dendroecological assessment of whitebark pine in the Sawtooth Salmon River region, Idaho

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278529
Title:
A dendroecological assessment of whitebark pine in the Sawtooth Salmon River region, Idaho
Author:
Perkins, Dana Lee
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) tree-ring chronologies of 700 to greater than 1,000 years in length were developed for four sites in the Sawtooth-Salmon River region, central Idaho. These ring-width chronologies are used to (1) assess the dendrochronological characteristics of this species, (2) detect annual mortality dates of whitebark pine attributed to a widespread mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopk.) epidemic during the 1909 to 1940 period, and (3) establish the response of whitebark pine tree ring-width growth to climate variables. Crossdating of whitebark pine tree-ring width patterns was verified. Ring-width indices had low mean sensitivity (0.123-0.174) typical of high elevation conifers in western North America, and variable first order autocorrelation (0.206-0.551). Mortality of dominant whitebark pine caused by mountain pine beetle had a maxima at 1930 on all four sites. Response functions and correlation analyses with state divisional weather records indicate that above average radial growth is positively correlated with winter and spring precipitation and inversely correlated with April temperature. These correlations appear to be a response to seasonal snowpack. Whitebark pine is a promising species for dendroclimatic studies.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Biology, Entomology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutritional Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Swetnam, Thomas W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA dendroecological assessment of whitebark pine in the Sawtooth Salmon River region, Idahoen_US
dc.creatorPerkins, Dana Leeen_US
dc.contributor.authorPerkins, Dana Leeen_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) tree-ring chronologies of 700 to greater than 1,000 years in length were developed for four sites in the Sawtooth-Salmon River region, central Idaho. These ring-width chronologies are used to (1) assess the dendrochronological characteristics of this species, (2) detect annual mortality dates of whitebark pine attributed to a widespread mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopk.) epidemic during the 1909 to 1940 period, and (3) establish the response of whitebark pine tree ring-width growth to climate variables. Crossdating of whitebark pine tree-ring width patterns was verified. Ring-width indices had low mean sensitivity (0.123-0.174) typical of high elevation conifers in western North America, and variable first order autocorrelation (0.206-0.551). Mortality of dominant whitebark pine caused by mountain pine beetle had a maxima at 1930 on all four sites. Response functions and correlation analyses with state divisional weather records indicate that above average radial growth is positively correlated with winter and spring precipitation and inversely correlated with April temperature. These correlations appear to be a response to seasonal snowpack. Whitebark pine is a promising species for dendroclimatic studies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Entomology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSwetnam, Thomas W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1378301en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33848452en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.