Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278526
Title:
Gold and silver in the making of early modern Japan, 1550-1737
Author:
Gentry-Sheehan, Linnea, 1948-
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis examines the significance of gold and silver in the process of political consolidation and socioeconomic change in Japan from 1550 to 1737. I argue that the role of precious metals in the transformation of early modern Japan demands reassessment for several reasons: (1) control of the gold and silver mines had a significant impact on the ability of the warring overlords to consolidate their rule; (2) possession of gold and silver was indispensable to the establishment of the Tokugawa hegemony, a stable polity that lasted for 260 years; (3) gold and silver facilitated Japan's rapid commercialization; (4) gold and especially silver drew Japan into the dynamic system of international trade, which constituted the newly emerging world system of economic interdependence; and, (5) Japan's withdrawal from the world market system in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was related to the large losses of silver due to exports and the decline in mining production.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, Asia, Australia and Oceania.; Economics, History.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bernstein, Gail Lee

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGold and silver in the making of early modern Japan, 1550-1737en_US
dc.creatorGentry-Sheehan, Linnea, 1948-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGentry-Sheehan, Linnea, 1948-en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the significance of gold and silver in the process of political consolidation and socioeconomic change in Japan from 1550 to 1737. I argue that the role of precious metals in the transformation of early modern Japan demands reassessment for several reasons: (1) control of the gold and silver mines had a significant impact on the ability of the warring overlords to consolidate their rule; (2) possession of gold and silver was indispensable to the establishment of the Tokugawa hegemony, a stable polity that lasted for 260 years; (3) gold and silver facilitated Japan's rapid commercialization; (4) gold and especially silver drew Japan into the dynamic system of international trade, which constituted the newly emerging world system of economic interdependence; and, (5) Japan's withdrawal from the world market system in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was related to the large losses of silver due to exports and the decline in mining production.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Asia, Australia and Oceania.en_US
dc.subjectEconomics, History.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBernstein, Gail Leeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1378299en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33848221en_US
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