Cleaning up the future with an autonomous space processor for orbital debris

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278519
Title:
Cleaning up the future with an autonomous space processor for orbital debris
Author:
Ingmire, Jennifer Joan
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In 1957, the space race began with the launch of Sputnik. The Soviet Union and the United States fought to be the first to place an object in earth orbit, to maintain it in orbit the longest, and eventually to land humans on the moon. During this time of competition, nothing was done to remove the spent objects or man-made debris from orbit. In recent years, man has become interested in the environment and the effects of his actions on it. This environmental consciousness has begun to extend to NASA and the space program. NASA has realized that the amount of orbited space debris around the earth poses a threat to future manned and unmanned missions. It is for this reason that Dr. Kumar Ramohalli, at the University of Arizona, proposed the concept of an Autonomous Space Professor for Orbital Debris (ASPOD). This thesis is designed to be a summary of the ASPOD spacecraft, what has been done on it, and what still needs to be done.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Aerospace.; Engineering, Mechanical.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ramohalli, Kumar N.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCleaning up the future with an autonomous space processor for orbital debrisen_US
dc.creatorIngmire, Jennifer Joanen_US
dc.contributor.authorIngmire, Jennifer Joanen_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 1957, the space race began with the launch of Sputnik. The Soviet Union and the United States fought to be the first to place an object in earth orbit, to maintain it in orbit the longest, and eventually to land humans on the moon. During this time of competition, nothing was done to remove the spent objects or man-made debris from orbit. In recent years, man has become interested in the environment and the effects of his actions on it. This environmental consciousness has begun to extend to NASA and the space program. NASA has realized that the amount of orbited space debris around the earth poses a threat to future manned and unmanned missions. It is for this reason that Dr. Kumar Ramohalli, at the University of Arizona, proposed the concept of an Autonomous Space Professor for Orbital Debris (ASPOD). This thesis is designed to be a summary of the ASPOD spacecraft, what has been done on it, and what still needs to be done.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Aerospace.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Mechanical.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace and Mechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRamohalli, Kumar N.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1378286en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33810242en_US
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