Ecology of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) in a desert-grassland community in southern Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278515
Title:
Ecology of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) in a desert-grassland community in southern Arizona
Author:
Martin, Brent Errol, 1952-
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
After 6-10 years of mark-recapture observations, I studied seven desert tortoises by radio-telemetry during 1990-1992 in a desert-grassland community in Pinal County, Arizona. Six estimated home-range areas averaged 14.7 ha. Winter-spring (Nov-Jun) use areas (overline x=0.7 ha) were significantly smaller (P = 0.002) than summer-fall (Jul-Oct) use areas (overline x=10.7 ha). A correction formula inflated 1-2 summer-fall use areas of five tortoises 4-41% larger than their corrected home-range areas. Extended movements by females were significantly more frequent (P = 0.0001) than those of males during Mar-Jul, significantly less frequent (P = 0.0057) than males during Aug-Oct, and most frequent by both sexes in September. Use of two slopes and terraces was not season-dependent (P = 0.9159). Tortoises variably used four shelter types (rock, soil burrow, wood rat nest, vegetation), significantly with south-facing entrance aspects (P 0.0005). Hibernaculum structure and location varied. Hibernation ranged from 88-315 days. Radio-equipped tortoises included reuse of mark-recapture locations.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Biology, Zoology.
Degree Name:
M.Sc.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable natural resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lowe, Charles H.; Krausman, Paul R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEcology of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) in a desert-grassland community in southern Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorMartin, Brent Errol, 1952-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Brent Errol, 1952-en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAfter 6-10 years of mark-recapture observations, I studied seven desert tortoises by radio-telemetry during 1990-1992 in a desert-grassland community in Pinal County, Arizona. Six estimated home-range areas averaged 14.7 ha. Winter-spring (Nov-Jun) use areas (overline x=0.7 ha) were significantly smaller (P = 0.002) than summer-fall (Jul-Oct) use areas (overline x=10.7 ha). A correction formula inflated 1-2 summer-fall use areas of five tortoises 4-41% larger than their corrected home-range areas. Extended movements by females were significantly more frequent (P = 0.0001) than those of males during Mar-Jul, significantly less frequent (P = 0.0057) than males during Aug-Oct, and most frequent by both sexes in September. Use of two slopes and terraces was not season-dependent (P = 0.9159). Tortoises variably used four shelter types (rock, soil burrow, wood rat nest, vegetation), significantly with south-facing entrance aspects (P 0.0005). Hibernaculum structure and location varied. Hibernation ranged from 88-315 days. Radio-equipped tortoises included reuse of mark-recapture locations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Zoology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.Sc.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable natural resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLowe, Charles H.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorKrausman, Paul R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1378281en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34220148en_US
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