Micronutrient intake values and cervical dysplasia and cancer in Hualapai and Apache women

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278507
Title:
Micronutrient intake values and cervical dysplasia and cancer in Hualapai and Apache women
Author:
De Giovanni, Gia Marie, 1969-
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated the hypothesis that Native American women of the Southwest will have lower intakes of vitamins A, C, E, carotenes, and folate since Native American women in this region have a high incidence of cervical cancer. Three data sets of 24-hour recalls were collected from two different Native Americans tribes in Arizona to assess dietary intake. The results were not consistent in demonstrating that the nutrients implicated in cervical cancer are being consumed in inadequate quantities as had been expected. However, diet cannot be eliminated as a possible risk factor. Fruit and vegetable consumption may be related to reduced cervical cancer risk. Not only are fruits and vegetables sources of micronutrients associated with cervical cancer, they also have nonnutritive components that may be anticarcinogenic themselves or work synergistically with the micronutrients to prevent cancer. Therefore, micronutrient intake obtained specifically from fruit and vegetable sources needs to be assessed.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women's Studies.; Health Sciences, Nutrition.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutritional Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ritenbaugh, Cheryl

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMicronutrient intake values and cervical dysplasia and cancer in Hualapai and Apache womenen_US
dc.creatorDe Giovanni, Gia Marie, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Giovanni, Gia Marie, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the hypothesis that Native American women of the Southwest will have lower intakes of vitamins A, C, E, carotenes, and folate since Native American women in this region have a high incidence of cervical cancer. Three data sets of 24-hour recalls were collected from two different Native Americans tribes in Arizona to assess dietary intake. The results were not consistent in demonstrating that the nutrients implicated in cervical cancer are being consumed in inadequate quantities as had been expected. However, diet cannot be eliminated as a possible risk factor. Fruit and vegetable consumption may be related to reduced cervical cancer risk. Not only are fruits and vegetables sources of micronutrients associated with cervical cancer, they also have nonnutritive components that may be anticarcinogenic themselves or work synergistically with the micronutrients to prevent cancer. Therefore, micronutrient intake obtained specifically from fruit and vegetable sources needs to be assessed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRitenbaugh, Cherylen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1376073en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33867240en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33486694en_US
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