"Ism-schism" worldview and the demise of nature: Ecofeminism as a viable alternative

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278506
Title:
"Ism-schism" worldview and the demise of nature: Ecofeminism as a viable alternative
Author:
Liska, Joyce, 1955-
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This paper suggests that environmental degradation is a symptom of a corrupt worldview. The dominant Western worldview construes the world as an aggregate of component parts having an antithetical, competitive relationship. This dualistic arrangement which divides and then negates the "other" conditions people to value aggression and power, and inevitably results in violence. Nature, in this hierarchical caste system is regarded as inferior, inert, or evil. Behavior and social institutions, such as the Christian religion, science and capitalist economy both reflect and reproduce these destructive values. Ecofeminism, by contrast, offers an alternative worldview more conducive to environmental prosperity. It regards the cosmos holistically, with all components having an equally valid, albeit distinctive, significance. This orientation emphasizes compassion and communion rather than fear and subjugation. Dissociating from the ego-based mindset of domination which underpins social and environmental decay allows the possibility of transforming consciousness and establishing an ecological worldview.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Women's Studies.; Environmental Sciences.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
King, David A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.title"Ism-schism" worldview and the demise of nature: Ecofeminism as a viable alternativeen_US
dc.creatorLiska, Joyce, 1955-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLiska, Joyce, 1955-en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper suggests that environmental degradation is a symptom of a corrupt worldview. The dominant Western worldview construes the world as an aggregate of component parts having an antithetical, competitive relationship. This dualistic arrangement which divides and then negates the "other" conditions people to value aggression and power, and inevitably results in violence. Nature, in this hierarchical caste system is regarded as inferior, inert, or evil. Behavior and social institutions, such as the Christian religion, science and capitalist economy both reflect and reproduce these destructive values. Ecofeminism, by contrast, offers an alternative worldview more conducive to environmental prosperity. It regards the cosmos holistically, with all components having an equally valid, albeit distinctive, significance. This orientation emphasizes compassion and communion rather than fear and subjugation. Dissociating from the ego-based mindset of domination which underpins social and environmental decay allows the possibility of transforming consciousness and establishing an ecological worldview.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKing, David A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1376049en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33519304en_US
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