Prescribed fire and ecosystem management: Managerial considerations for longer temporal and broader spatial scales

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278497
Title:
Prescribed fire and ecosystem management: Managerial considerations for longer temporal and broader spatial scales
Author:
Keating, Brian Elliott, 1968-
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Ecosystem management is positioned as the modern paradigm of resource management. Fire management activities within the natural resource management agencies, under the adoption of an ecosystem management approach, supports an increased focus upon prescribed and manager-ignited fire programs. A review of past national fire policies and the effects they have had upon ecosystem conditions today further supports the role for prescribed fire. Under an ecosystem management approach, resource managers need to consider the effects of fire management activities over longer temporal and broader spatial scales. Examining the ecological, social, political, and economic aspects surrounding fire management activities on these scales will help ensure healthier ecosystems in perpetuity. Although the suppression of wildfires will remain a necessary component to fire management activities today, there needs to be an increased effort to reintroduce fire into ecosystems and to recognize fire as a natural component vital to maintaining ecosystem health.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.; Environmental Sciences.; Agriculture, Range Management.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cortner, Hanna J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePrescribed fire and ecosystem management: Managerial considerations for longer temporal and broader spatial scalesen_US
dc.creatorKeating, Brian Elliott, 1968-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKeating, Brian Elliott, 1968-en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEcosystem management is positioned as the modern paradigm of resource management. Fire management activities within the natural resource management agencies, under the adoption of an ecosystem management approach, supports an increased focus upon prescribed and manager-ignited fire programs. A review of past national fire policies and the effects they have had upon ecosystem conditions today further supports the role for prescribed fire. Under an ecosystem management approach, resource managers need to consider the effects of fire management activities over longer temporal and broader spatial scales. Examining the ecological, social, political, and economic aspects surrounding fire management activities on these scales will help ensure healthier ecosystems in perpetuity. Although the suppression of wildfires will remain a necessary component to fire management activities today, there needs to be an increased effort to reintroduce fire into ecosystems and to recognize fire as a natural component vital to maintaining ecosystem health.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Range Management.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCortner, Hanna J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1375998en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33485185en_US
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