Intercultural dynamics of the Hopi-Navajo land dispute: Concepts of colonialism and manifest destiny in the Southwest

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278480
Title:
Intercultural dynamics of the Hopi-Navajo land dispute: Concepts of colonialism and manifest destiny in the Southwest
Author:
Havens, William Michael, 1946-
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Territorial growth of Indian lands under American domination seems to be inconsistent with the expressed goals of a dominant society and is certainly inconsistent with the patterns reflected in the relationships between Indian communities and the United States. How is it that in this atmosphere fueled by the desire to take land from Tribes the Navajo Nation grew from 3.5 million acres in 1868 to over 16 million acres (a 358% increase) while their neighbors, the Hopis, lost over 40% of their original reservation land and most other tribes, as well, have lost much of their traditional use areas? This research attempts to answer these questions while testing the theory that Navajo expansion has been through a unique form of colonialism driven by a religiously rooted sense of Manifest Destiny. The results should provide insights for historians, practitioners of Indian Law, political scientists, and tribal leaders.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, United States.; Law.; Political Science, General.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stauss, Jay M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleIntercultural dynamics of the Hopi-Navajo land dispute: Concepts of colonialism and manifest destiny in the Southwesten_US
dc.creatorHavens, William Michael, 1946-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHavens, William Michael, 1946-en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTerritorial growth of Indian lands under American domination seems to be inconsistent with the expressed goals of a dominant society and is certainly inconsistent with the patterns reflected in the relationships between Indian communities and the United States. How is it that in this atmosphere fueled by the desire to take land from Tribes the Navajo Nation grew from 3.5 million acres in 1868 to over 16 million acres (a 358% increase) while their neighbors, the Hopis, lost over 40% of their original reservation land and most other tribes, as well, have lost much of their traditional use areas? This research attempts to answer these questions while testing the theory that Navajo expansion has been through a unique form of colonialism driven by a religiously rooted sense of Manifest Destiny. The results should provide insights for historians, practitioners of Indian Law, political scientists, and tribal leaders.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.subjectLaw.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStauss, Jay M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1362209en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33305894en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.