Bird abundance as an indicator of habitat quality for breeding birds

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/278475
Title:
Bird abundance as an indicator of habitat quality for breeding birds
Author:
Stearns, Danielle Marie, 1969-
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Reproductive success and survival of birds often are impractical to measure. Therefore, biologists frequently rely on measures of bird abundance alone to evaluate habitat quality for breeding birds. I examined whether results from standard survey techniques for birds during the breeding season reflected number of nesting pairs and reproductive success of 5 passerine species. Abundance of 3 species was positively associated with number of nesting pairs, but the relationship between abundance and reproductive success varied among these species. Differences in detectability of breeding males may partly explain why abundance and number of nesting pairs were related in some species and not in others. Variations in the availability and quality of habitat patches among plots could produce the different relationships I observed between abundance and reproductive success. My results suggest that measures of reproductive success as well as abundance should be used to determine habitat quality for breeding birds.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable natural resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reid, C. P. Patrick

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBird abundance as an indicator of habitat quality for breeding birdsen_US
dc.creatorStearns, Danielle Marie, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorStearns, Danielle Marie, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractReproductive success and survival of birds often are impractical to measure. Therefore, biologists frequently rely on measures of bird abundance alone to evaluate habitat quality for breeding birds. I examined whether results from standard survey techniques for birds during the breeding season reflected number of nesting pairs and reproductive success of 5 passerine species. Abundance of 3 species was positively associated with number of nesting pairs, but the relationship between abundance and reproductive success varied among these species. Differences in detectability of breeding males may partly explain why abundance and number of nesting pairs were related in some species and not in others. Variations in the availability and quality of habitat patches among plots could produce the different relationships I observed between abundance and reproductive success. My results suggest that measures of reproductive success as well as abundance should be used to determine habitat quality for breeding birds.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable natural resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReid, C. P. Patricken_US
dc.identifier.proquest1362202en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33270673en_US
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